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proscription

[proh-skrip-shuh n] /proʊˈskrɪp ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of proscribing.
2.
the state of being proscribed.
3.
outlawry, interdiction, or prohibition.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English proscripcioun < Latin prōscrīptiōn- (stem of prōscrīptiō) public notice of confiscation or outlawry, equivalent to prōscrīpt(us) (past participle of prōscrībere to proscribe) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
proscriptive
[proh-skrip-tiv] /proʊˈskrɪp tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
proscriptively, adverb
nonproscription, noun
nonproscriptive, adjective
nonproscriptively, adverb
unproscriptive, adjective
unproscriptively, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for proscription
  • In exchange, the owner agreed to a license revocation, a two year proscription on the premises and a bond claim.
  • Many police departments attempt to impose ethical standards and effective policing through policy, proscription, and punishment.
  • However, this proscription against to annoy is not rooted in history.
British Dictionary definitions for proscription

proscription

/prəʊˈskrɪpʃən/
noun
1.
the act of proscribing or the state of being proscribed
2.
denunciation, prohibition, or exclusion
3.
outlawry or ostracism
Derived Forms
proscriptive, adjective
proscriptively, adverb
proscriptiveness, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin prōscriptiō; see proscribe
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for proscription
n.

late 14c., "decree of condemnation, outlawry," from Latin proscriptionem (nominative proscriptio) "a public notice (of sale); proscription, outlawry, confiscation," noun of action from past participle stem of proscribere (see proscribe).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for proscription

in ancient Rome, a posted notice listing Roman citizens who had been declared outlaws and whose goods were confiscated. Rewards were offered to anyone killing or betraying the proscribed, and severe penalties were inflicted on anyone harbouring them. Their properties were confiscated, and their sons and grandsons were forever barred from public office and from the Senate

Learn more about proscription with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Difficulty index for proscription

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Word Value for proscription

18
22
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