proverbial

[pruh-vur-bee-uhl]
adjective
1.
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a proverb: proverbial brevity.
2.
expressed in a proverb or proverbs: proverbial wisdom.
3.
of the nature of or resembling a proverb: proverbial sayings.
4.
having been made the subject of a proverb: the proverbial barn door which is closed too late.
5.
having become an object of common mention or reference: your proverbial inability to get anywhere on time.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin prōverbiālis. See proverb, -al1

proverbially, adverb
unproverbial, adjective
unproverbially, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
proverbial (prəˈvɜːbɪəl)
 
adj
1.  (prenominal) commonly or traditionally referred to, esp as being an example of some peculiarity, characteristic, etc
2.  of, connected with, embodied in, or resembling a proverb
 
pro'verbially
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

proverbial
mid-15c., from L.L. proverbialis, from proverbium (see proverb).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
That's our new conventional wisdom about an age of proverbial prudery.
If transients are the proverbial wolves of the sea, this is a pack snatching a
  rabbit, not hauling down an elk.
They may feel the brunt of their position, but one may liken them to the
  proverbial mouse in the maze: they lack the aerial view.
The best way universities can support today's working learner is to take the
  proverbial leap of faith and embrace the new.
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