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[prok-see] /ˈprɒk si/
noun, plural proxies.
the agency, function, or power of a person authorized to act as the deputy or substitute for another.
the person so authorized; substitute; agent.
a written authorization empowering another person to vote or act for the signer, as at a meeting of stockholders.
an ally or confederate who can be relied upon to speak or act in one's behalf.
Origin of proxy
late Middle English
1400-50; late Middle English prokesye, procusie, contraction of procuracy procuration. See procure, -acy Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for proxy
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I am writing nonsense now, and as henceforth I can only be foolish by proxy, I had better stop.

    Letters of Two Brides Honore de Balzac
  • The blessing was pronounced by Gardiner, and the proxy marriage was completed.

    The Reign of Mary Tudor W. Llewelyn Williams.
  • Although the marriage had been performed in Ferrara by proxy, Alexander wished the service to be said again in Rome.

    Lucretia Borgia Ferdinand Gregorovius
  • You will wed her—she will bear your name; but you will marry her by proxy, and I shall be your proctor.

    Samuel Brohl & Company Victor Cherbuliez
  • It enabled him to make a long arm, as it were, and manipulate the matter in effect without a proxy.

    The Storm Centre Charles Egbert Craddock
British Dictionary definitions for proxy


noun (pl) proxies
a person authorized to act on behalf of someone else; agent: to vote by proxy
the authority, esp in the form of a document, given to a person to act on behalf of someone else
(computing) short for proxy server
Word Origin
C15: prokesye, contraction of procuracy, from Latin prōcūrātiō procuration; see procure
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for proxy

early 15c., proccy, prokecye, "agency of one who acts instead of another; letter of power of attorney," contraction of Anglo-French procuracie (c.1300), from Medieval Latin procuratia "administration," from Latin procuratio "a caring for, management," from procurare "manage" (see procure). Also cf. proctor (n.). Meaning "person who acts in place of another" is from 1610s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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proxy in Culture

proxy definition

A person authorized to act for another, or the written authorization to act for another.

Note: Shareholders in corporations may designate proxies to represent them at stockholders' meetings and vote their shares.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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proxy in Technology

A process that accepts requests for some service and passes them on to the real server. A proxy may run on dedicated hardware or may be purely software. It may transform the request in some way or provide some additional layer of functionality such as caching or remote access. A proxy may be intended to increase security, e.g. a web proxy that allows multiple clients inside an organisation to access the Internet through a single secure, shared connection.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010
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