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pull-in

[poo l-in] /ˈpʊlˌɪn/
noun, adjective, British
1.
Origin
1935-1940
1935-40; noun, adj. use of verb phrase pull in
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for pull-in
  • Tent sites have large shade trees and pull-in areas provide electricity and sewer service.
British Dictionary definitions for pull-in

pull in

verb (adverb)
1.
(intransitive) often foll by to. to reach a destination: the train pulled in at the station
2.
(intransitive) (of a motor vehicle, driver, etc) Also pull over
  1. to draw in to the side of the road in order to stop or to allow another vehicle to pass
  2. to stop (at a café, lay-by, etc)
3.
(transitive) to draw or attract: his appearance will pull in the crowds
4.
(transitive) (slang) to arrest
5.
(transitive) to earn or gain (money)
noun
6.
(Brit) a roadside café, esp for lorry drivers
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Difficulty index for pull-in

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Word Value for pull

6
10
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Quotes with pull-in