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purport

[v. per-pawrt, -pohrt, pur-pawrt, -pohrt; n. pur-pawrt, -pohrt] /v. pərˈpɔrt, -ˈpoʊrt, ˈpɜr pɔrt, -poʊrt; n. ˈpɜr pɔrt, -poʊrt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to present, especially deliberately, the appearance of being; profess or claim, often falsely:
a document purporting to be official.
2.
to convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended; express or imply.
noun
3.
the meaning, import, or sense:
the main purport of your letter.
4.
purpose; intention; object:
the main purport of their visit to France.
Origin of purport
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; (v.) late Middle English purporten < Anglo-French purporter to convey, equivalent to pur- pro-1 + porter to carry (< Latin portāre); (noun) late Middle English < Anglo-French, derivative of the v.
Related forms
purportless, adjective
Synonyms
2. mean, intend, signify. 3. implication, drift, trend, gist. See meaning.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for purporting
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It is in a small, cramped hand, and you know the one purporting to be from him later was in a big, sprawly hand.

    The Come Back Carolyn Wells
  • After this, writing, purporting to be from Mr. Smith, came frequently.

    The Arena Various
  • A sealed package is entrusted to them, purporting to be from the papal ambassador in Spain.

    The Jesuits, 1534-1921 Thomas J. Campbell
  • (Bohn's), is the following, purporting to be from Hakluyt, vol.

  • The first clue—the forged letter, purporting to come from Robert Redmayne to his brother.

    The Red Redmaynes Eden Phillpotts
  • Lopez had gone, purporting,—as he said,—to be back to dinner.

    The Prime Minister Anthony Trollope
  • Another testimony, purporting to be by a distinguished writer of England, appeared in the American papers at the time.

  • Some draw maps, purporting to come from a deceased schoolmate.

    The Spirit Land Samuel B. (Samuel Bulfinch) Emmons
  • There is a Jacobite tract of 1750, purporting to be written by his equerry, Henry Goring.

British Dictionary definitions for purporting

purport

verb (transitive) (pɜːˈpɔːt)
1.
to claim (to be a certain thing, etc) by manner or appearance, esp falsely
2.
(esp of speech or writing) to signify or imply
noun (ˈpɜːpɔːt)
3.
meaning; significance
4.
purpose; object; intention
Word Origin
C15: from Anglo-French: contents, from Old French porporter to convey, from por- forth + porter to carry, from Latin portāre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for purporting

purport

n.

early 15c., from Anglo-French purport (late 13c.), Old French porport "contents, tenor," back-formation from purporter "to contain, convey, carry," from pur- (from Latin pro- "forth;" see pur-) + Old French porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry" (see port (n.1)).

v.

early 15c., "indicate, express, set forth," from the noun in English and from Anglo-French purporter (c.1300), from Old French purporter (see purport (n.)). Related: Purported; purporting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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