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purported

[per-pawr-tid, -pohr-] /pərˈpɔr tɪd, -ˈpoʊr-/
adjective
1.
reputed or claimed; alleged:
We saw no evidence of his purported wealth.
Origin
1890-1895
1890-95; purport + -ed2
Related forms
purportedly, adverb
unpurported, adjective

purport

[v. per-pawrt, -pohrt, pur-pawrt, -pohrt; n. pur-pawrt, -pohrt] /v. pərˈpɔrt, -ˈpoʊrt, ˈpɜr pɔrt, -poʊrt; n. ˈpɜr pɔrt, -poʊrt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to present, especially deliberately, the appearance of being; profess or claim, often falsely:
a document purporting to be official.
2.
to convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended; express or imply.
noun
3.
the meaning, import, or sense:
the main purport of your letter.
4.
purpose; intention; object:
the main purport of their visit to France.
Origin
1375-1425; (v.) late Middle English purporten < Anglo-French purporter to convey, equivalent to pur- pro-1 + porter to carry (< Latin portāre); (noun) late Middle English < Anglo-French, derivative of the v.
Related forms
purportless, adjective
Synonyms
2. mean, intend, signify. 3. implication, drift, trend, gist. See meaning.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for purported
  • And the speed of their purported ascent, through a week of consistently bad weather, seemed equally improbable.
  • While they are two totally different drinks, both are purported to wake the corpse.
  • The purported benefits: fewer hospital visits, better care, and much lower costs.
  • Scores of popular books have seized on this purported dichotomy.
  • Smoking wasn't purported to be harmful when it became ubiquitous.
  • All purported to be methods for modeling, and hence understanding, complex phenomena.
  • Of course, none of these purported medical benefits have any grounding in science.
  • The response to purported ill effects of global warming is a political question.
  • It would take many times the currently purported age of the universe to statistically occur.
  • They were backed up by what purported to be a minefield.
British Dictionary definitions for purported

purported

/pɜːˈpɔːtɪd/
adjective
1.
alleged; supposed; rumoured: a purported two million dollar deal
Derived Forms
purportedly, adverb

purport

verb (transitive) (pɜːˈpɔːt)
1.
to claim (to be a certain thing, etc) by manner or appearance, esp falsely
2.
(esp of speech or writing) to signify or imply
noun (ˈpɜːpɔːt)
3.
meaning; significance
4.
purpose; object; intention
Word Origin
C15: from Anglo-French: contents, from Old French porporter to convey, from por- forth + porter to carry, from Latin portāre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for purported

purport

n.

early 15c., from Anglo-French purport (late 13c.), Old French porport "contents, tenor," back-formation from purporter "to contain, convey, carry," from pur- (from Latin pro- "forth;" see pur-) + Old French porter "to carry," from Latin portare "to carry" (see port (n.1)).

v.

early 15c., "indicate, express, set forth," from the noun in English and from Anglo-French purporter (c.1300), from Old French purporter (see purport (n.)). Related: Purported; purporting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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