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push

[poo sh] /pʊʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to press upon or against (a thing) with force in order to move it away.
2.
to move (something) in a specified way by exerting force; shove; drive:
to push something aside; to push the door open.
3.
to effect or accomplish by thrusting obstacles aside:
to push one's way through the crowd.
4.
to cause to extend or project; thrust.
5.
to press or urge to some action or course:
His mother pushed him to get a job.
6.
to press (an action, proposal, etc.) with energy and insistence:
to push a bill through Congress.
7.
to carry (an action or thing) toward a conclusion or extreme:
She pushed the project to completion.
8.
to press the adoption, use, sale, etc., of:
to push inferior merchandise on customers.
9.
to press or bear hard upon, as in dealings with someone:
The prosecutor pushed him for an answer.
10.
to put into difficulties because of the lack of something specified (usually followed by for):
to be pushed for time.
11.
Slang. to peddle (illicit drugs).
12.
Informal. to be approaching a specific age, speed, or the like:
The maestro is pushing ninety-two.
13.
Photography. to modify (film processing) to compensate for underexposure.
verb (used without object)
14.
to exert a thrusting force upon something.
15.
to use steady force in moving a thing away; shove.
16.
to make one's way with effort or persistence, as against difficulty or opposition.
17.
to extend or project; thrust:
The point of land pushed far out into the sea.
18.
to put forth vigorous or persistent efforts.
19.
Slang. to sell illicit drugs.
20.
to move on being pushed:
a swinging door that pushes easily.
noun
21.
the act of pushing; a shove or thrust.
22.
a contrivance or part to be pushed in order to operate a mechanism.
23.
a vigorous onset or effort.
24.
a determined advance against opposition, obstacles, etc.
25.
a vigorous and determined military attack or campaign:
The big push began in April.
26.
the pressure of circumstances, activities, etc.
27.
Informal. persevering energy; enterprise.
28.
Informal. a crowd or company of people.
29.
British. dismissal from a job; sack.
30.
Australian Slang. a gang of hoodlums.
Verb phrases
31.
push around, to treat contemptuously and unfairly; bully:
She's not the kind of person who can be pushed around.
32.
push off, Informal. to go away; depart:
We stopped at Denver for the night and were ready to push off again the following morning.
33.
push on, to press forward; continue; proceed:
The pioneers, despite overwhelming obstacles, pushed on across the plains.
Idioms
34.
push one's luck. luck (def 12).
35.
when / if push comes to shove, when or if matters are ultimately confronted or resolved; when or if a problem must be faced; in a crucial situation:
If push comes to shove, the government will impose quotas on imports.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English pushen, poshen, posson (v.) < Middle French pousser, Old French po(u)lser < Latin pulsāre. See pulsate
Related forms
outpush, verb (used with object)
unpushed, adjective
Synonyms
3. shoulder. 5. persuade, impel.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for pushed
  • The storm came ashore at the time of the high tide, which added to the surge of water being pushed ahead by the hurricane.
  • Modifications of the trachea to allow speech pushed the trachea and esophagus further down the throat to make way.
  • For centuries, logging and farming had pushed pandas to steeper and higher terrain.
  • He pushed her out of the way, and the shark swallowed him.
  • When the driver pushed the mower, the pistons went up and down.
  • Two students said officers had pushed back the protesters with batons.
  • All too often, the concern about a major's practical prospects are pushed upon students by well-intentioned parents.
  • Thus the second tier will be pushed upwards instead of being weighed down by lesser students.
  • At first, scientists weren't sure what pushed the plates around.
  • The researchers say archaeological and fossil evidence strongly suggests that ancient hunters pushed the animals to extinction.
British Dictionary definitions for pushed

pushed

/pʊʃt/
adjective
1.
(often foll by for) (informal) short (of) or in need (of time, money, etc)

push

/pʊʃ/
verb
1.
when tr, often foll by off, away, etc. to apply steady force to (something) in order to move it
2.
to thrust (one's way) through something, such as a crowd, by force
3.
when intr,often foll by for. to apply oneself vigorously (to achieving a task, plan, etc)
4.
(transitive) to encourage or urge (a person) to some action, decision, etc
5.
when intr,often foll by for. to be an advocate or promoter (of): to push for acceptance of one's theories
6.
(transitive) to use one's influence to help (a person): to push one's own candidate
7.
to bear upon (oneself or another person) in order to achieve more effort, better results, etc: she was a woman who liked to push her husband
8.
  1. (transitive) to take undue risks, esp through overconfidence, thus risking failure: to push one's luck
  2. (intransitive) to act overconfidently
9.
(sport) to hit (a ball) with a stiff pushing stroke
10.
(transitive) (informal) to sell (narcotic drugs) illegally
11.
(intransitive; foll by out, into, etc) (esp of geographical features) to reach or extend: the cliffs pushed out to the sea
12.
(transitive) to overdevelop (a photographic film), usually by the equivalent of up to two stops, to compensate for underexposure or increase contrast
13.
(slang) push up daisies, push up the daisies, to be dead and buried
noun
14.
the act of pushing; thrust
15.
a part or device that is pressed to operate some mechanism
16.
(informal) ambitious or enterprising drive, energy, etc
17.
(informal) a special effort or attempt to advance, as of an army in a war: to make a push
18.
(informal) a number of people gathered in one place, such as at a party
19.
(Austral, slang) a group or gang, esp one considered to be a clique
20.
(sport) a stiff pushing stroke
21.
(informal) at a push, with difficulty; only just
22.
(informal, mainly Brit) the push, dismissal, esp from employment
23.
(informal) when push comes to shove, when matters become critical; when a decision needs to be made
Word Origin
C13: from Old French pousser, from Latin pulsāre, from pellere to drive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pushed

push

v.

early 14c., from Old French poulser (Modern French pousser), from Latin pulsare "to beat, strike, push," frequentative of pellere (past participle pulsus) "to push, drive, beat" (see pulse (n.1)). Meaning "promote" is from 1714; meaning "approach a certain age" is from 1937. For palatization of -s-, OED compares brush (n.1); quash. Related: Pushed; pushing.

"Pushing up the daisies now," said a soldier of his dead comrade. ["The American Florist," vol. XLVIII, No. 1504, March 31, 1917]
To push (someone) around is from 1923. To push (one's) luck is from 1754. To push the envelope in figurative sense is late 1980s. To push up daisies "be dead and buried" is from World War I.

n.

1560s, from push (v.). Phrase push comes to shove is from 1936.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for pushed

push

noun
  1. A fight between street gangs; rumble (1940s+ Street gang)
  2. Asupervisor: Jigger's first season as a camp push (1930+ Loggers)
  3. Aradio frequency, such as is tuned by pressing a push-button (1970s+ Army)
  4. An intense sustained effort: They made a big push to get the damn thing done (1940s+)
verb
  1. (also push across) To kill someone: when one of our boys gets pushed/ He might have pushed Foster across (1940s+)
  2. To approach a specified age: You're pushing 50 (1937+)
  3. To advertise; publicize; promote: They don't have to push reference books too much (1894+)
  4. (also push for)Torecommend; boost; get behind: He decided to push my idea, and push for two new labs (1888+)
  5. To sell, esp in an aggressive way; hawk: Push the specials today, okay? (1940s+)
  6. To press or importune, esp too often and too hard: I'll probably do what you want, just stop pushing (1578+)
  7. To sell narcotics; peddle; deal: Funny cigarettes ain't all that one pushes (1930s+ Narcotics)
  8. To distribute and pass counterfeit money (1940s+ Underworld)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Related Abbreviations for pushed

PUSH

People United to Serve Humanity
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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12
13
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