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quash

[kwosh] /kwɒʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to put down or suppress completely; quell; subdue:
to quash a rebellion.
2.
to make void, annul, or set aside (a law, indictment, decision, etc.).
Origin of quash
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English quashen to smash, break, overcome, suppress < Old French quasser, in part < Latin quassāre to shake (frequentative of quatere to shake; cf. concussion); in part < Late Latin cassāre to annul, derivative of Latin cassus empty, void
Related forms
unquashed, adjective
Synonyms
1. crush, squash, quench, repress.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for quash
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But there was considerable delay also on the part of the Pope, who wanted to quash the election and to appoint by "provision."

    William de Colchester Ernest Harold Pearce
  • Come, quash, into the bush, and help me to look at the other scratches and dress them.

    The Rover of the Andes R.M. Ballantyne
  • Hence it was necessary for the State and Church to quash their indictment before God could do the same.

  • But, then, he had had to quash the thought that suggested it.

    It Never Can Happen Again William De Morgan
  • It can quash the decisions of Juges de Paix only when they exceed their power.

    Paris William Walton
British Dictionary definitions for quash

quash

/kwɒʃ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to subdue forcefully and completely; put down; suppress
2.
to annul or make void (a law, decision, etc)
3.
to reject (an indictment, writ, etc) as invalid
Word Origin
C14: from Old French quasser, from Latin quassāre to shake
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for quash
v.

"to make void, annul," early 14c., from Old French quasser, casser "to annul, declare void," and directly from Medieval Latin quassare, alteration of Late Latin cassare, from cassus "null, void, empty" (see caste (n.)).

Meaning "to break, crush," is early 14c., from Old French quasser, casser "to break, smash, injure, harm, weaken," from Latin quassare "to shatter," frequentative of quatere (past participle quassus) "to shake," from PIE root *kwet- "to shake" (cf. Greek passein "to sprinkle," Lithuanian kuteti "to shake up," Old Saxon skuddian "to move violently," German schütteln "to shake," Old English scudan "to hasten").

The words have influenced each other in form and sense since Medieval Latin and now are somewhat grown together. Related: Quashed; quashing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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