quickly

[kwik-lee]
adverb
with speed; rapidly; very soon.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English quikly. See quick, -ly

quick, quickly (see usage note at quick).


See quick.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
quick (kwɪk)
 
adj
1.  (of an action, movement, etc) performed or occurring during a comparatively short time: a quick move
2.  lasting a comparatively short time; brief: a quick flight
3.  accomplishing something in a time that is shorter than normal: a quick worker
4.  characterized by rapidity of movement; swift or fast: a quick walker
5.  immediate or prompt: a quick reply
6.  (postpositive) eager or ready to perform (an action): quick to criticize
7.  responsive to stimulation; perceptive or alert; lively: a quick eye
8.  eager or enthusiastic for learning: a quick intelligence
9.  easily excited or aroused: a quick temper
10.  skilfully swift or nimble in one's movements or actions; deft: quick fingers
11.  archaic
 a.  alive; living
 b.  (as noun) living people (esp in the phrase the quick and the dead)
12.  archaic, dialect or lively or eager: a quick dog
13.  (of a fire) burning briskly
14.  composed of living plants: a quick hedge
15.  dialect (of sand) lacking firmness through being wet
16.  archaic quick with child pregnant, esp being in an advanced state of pregnancy, when the movements of the fetus can be felt
 
n
17.  any area of living flesh that is highly sensitive to pain or touch, esp that under a toenail or fingernail or around a healing wound
18.  the vital or most important part (of a thing)
19.  short for quickset
20.  cut someone to the quick to hurt someone's feelings deeply; offend gravely
 
adv
21.  in a rapid or speedy manner; swiftly
22.  soon: I hope he comes quick
 
interj
23.  a command requiring the hearer to perform an action immediately or in as short a time as possible
 
[Old English cwicu living; related to Old Saxon quik, Old High German queck, Old Norse kvikr alive, Latin vīvus alive, Greek bios life]
 
'quickly
 
adv
 
'quickness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
When you go to a fast-food restaurant, you expect to get your fries quickly.
Instead, the length of some courses will be based on how quickly students can
  master the subject, he said.
The new findings could boost hopes for species whose habitats are quickly
  changing due to climate change, experts say.
The researchers contend that the adult brain is thus more changeable more
  quickly than anyone thought.
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