rancor

[rang-ker]
noun
bitter, rankling resentment or ill will; hatred; malice.
Also, especially British, rancour.


Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English rancour < Middle French < Late Latin rancōr- (stem of rancor) rancidity, equivalent to Latin ranc(ēre) (see rancid) + -ōr- -or1

rancored; especially British, rancoured, adjective
unrancored, adjective


bitterness, spite, venom, animosity. See malevolence.


benevolence.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rancour or rancor (ˈræŋkə)
 
n
malicious resentfulness or hostility; spite
 
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin rancor rankness]
 
rancor or rancor
 
n
 
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin rancor rankness]
 
'rancorous or rancor
 
adj
 
'rancorously or rancor
 
adv
 
'rancorousness or rancor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rancor
early 13c., from O.Fr. rancor, from L. rancorem "rancidness, grudge, bitterness," from L. rancere "to stink" (see rancid). Rancorous is from 1580s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The profession itself is suffering from guilt and rancour.
And for the rancour conceived upon this displeasure, cometh up all his
  complaint of the possessions of the clergy.
The profession itself is suffering from guilt and rancour.
It is not the stuff of which partisan rancour is usually made.
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