ratify

ratify

[rat-uh-fahy]
verb (used with object), ratified, ratifying.
1.
to confirm by expressing consent, approval, or formal sanction: to ratify a constitutional amendment.
2.
to confirm (something done or arranged by an agent or by representatives) by such action.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English ratifien < Middle French ratifier < Medieval Latin ratificāre, equivalent to Latin rat(us) calculated (see rate1) + -ificāre -ify

ratifier, noun
nonratifying, adjective
unratified, adjective


1. corroborate, approve. 2. validate, establish.


1. veto, disapprove.
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World English Dictionary
ratify (ˈrætɪˌfaɪ)
 
vb , -fies, -fying, -fied
(tr) to give formal approval or consent to
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin ratus fixed (see rate1) + facere to make]
 
'ratifiable
 
adj
 
ratifi'cation
 
n
 
'ratifier
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ratify
c.1357, from O.Fr. ratifier (1294), from M.L. ratificare "confirm, approve," lit. "fix by reckoning," from L. ratus "fixed, valid" (pp. of reri "to reckon, think") + root of facere "to make" (see factitious).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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