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rationality

[rash-uh-nal-i-tee] /ˌræʃ əˈnæl ɪ ti/
noun, plural rationalities.
1.
the state or quality of being rational.
2.
the possession of reason.
3.
agreeableness to reason; reasonableness.
4.
the exercise of reason.
5.
a reasonable view, practice, etc.
Origin
1560-1570
1560-70; < Late Latin ratiōnālitās reasonableness. See rational, -ity
Related forms
antirationality, noun, adjective
nonrationality, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for rationality
  • What binds them is a commitment to logic and rationality.
  • Logic and rationality might contribute a bit to these questions but cannot answer them.
  • Therefore, our decisions must be tempered by logic, rationality and intelligence.
  • They'll never listen if you try logic and rationality- perhaps better to go after them using their own weapons.
  • As a result, maybe rationality has been devalued simply because it is no longer considered a unique human specialty.
  • Economists have tended to content themselves with a laughably simple picture of human motivation, rationality and well-being.
  • They would tend to play games in which rationality helps, such as blackjack or poker.
  • First, it was a reminder that politics often trumps rationality.
  • Our left brain is what goes about speech and rationality.
  • Economists, with their strong faith in rationality and liberty, have tended to agree.
British Dictionary definitions for rationality

rationality

/ˌræʃəˈnælɪtɪ/
noun (pl) -ties
1.
the state or quality of being rational or logical
2.
the possession or utilization of reason or logic
3.
a reasonable or logical opinion
4.
(economics) the assumption that an individual will compare all possible combinations of goods and their prices when making purchases
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for rationality
n.

1620s, "quality of having reason;" 1650s, "fact of being agreeable to reason," from French rationalité, from Late Latin rationalitas "reasonableness, rationality" (also source of Spanish racionalidad, Italian razionalita), from Latin rationalis (see rational).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for rationality

in philosophy, the faculty or process of drawing logical inferences. The term "reason" is also used in several other, narrower senses. Reason is in opposition to sensation, perception, feeling, desire, as the faculty (the existence of which is denied by empiricists) by which fundamental truths are intuitively apprehended. These fundamental truths are the causes or "reasons" of all derivative facts. According to the German philosopher Immanuel Kant, reason is the power of synthesizing into unity, by means of comprehensive principles, the concepts that are provided by the intellect. That reason which gives a priori principles Kant calls "pure reason," as distinguished from the "practical reason," which is specially concerned with the performance of actions. In formal logic the drawing of inferences (frequently called "ratiocination," from Latin ratiocinari, "to use the reasoning faculty") is classified from Aristotle on as deductive (from generals to particulars) and inductive (from particulars to generals).

Learn more about rationality with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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