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reap

[reep] /rip/
verb (used with object)
1.
to cut (wheat, rye, etc.) with a sickle or other implement or a machine, as in harvest.
2.
to gather or take (a crop, harvest, etc.).
3.
to get as a return, recompense, or result:
to reap large profits.
verb (used without object)
4.
to reap a crop, harvest, etc.
Origin of reap
900
before 900; Middle English repen, Old English repan, riopan; cognate with Middle Low German repen to ripple (flax); akin to ripe
Related forms
reapable, adjective
unreaped, adjective
Synonyms
3. gather, earn, realize, gain, win.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for reap
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I had laid my plans carefully, and I had expected to reap a nice harvest.

    The Long Voyage Carl Richard Jacobi
  • You will need practice to reap the full benefit of my instructions.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • Thou art desirous to know what advantage I reap by my uncle's demise.

    Clarissa, Volume 6 (of 9) Samuel Richardson
  • Since she had endured so much, why not endure a little longer and reap a dear reward?

    Dust Mr. and Mrs. Haldeman-Julius
  • The company consists principally of Baltimoreans, who will reap a harvest commensurate with the capital invested.

British Dictionary definitions for reap

reap

/riːp/
verb
1.
to cut or harvest (a crop), esp corn, from (a field or tract of land)
2.
(transitive) to gain or get (something) as a reward for or result of some action or enterprise
Derived Forms
reapable, adjective
Word Origin
Old English riopan; related to Norwegian ripa to scratch, Middle Low German repen to card, ripple (flax)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for reap
v.

"to cut grain with a hook or sickle," Old English reopan, Mercian form of ripan "to reap," related to Old English ripe "ripe" (see ripe). Related: Reaped; reaping.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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