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arrange

[uh-reynj] /əˈreɪndʒ/
verb (used with object), arranged, arranging.
1.
to place in proper, desired, or convenient order; adjust properly:
to arrange books on a shelf.
2.
to come to an agreement or understanding regarding:
The two sides arranged the sale of the property.
3.
to prepare or plan:
to arrange the details of a meeting.
4.
Music. to adapt (a composition) for a particular style of performance by voices or instruments.
verb (used without object), arranged, arranging.
5.
to make plans or preparations:
They arranged for a conference on Wednesday.
6.
to make a settlement; come to an agreement:
to arrange with the coal company for regular deliveries.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English arayngen < Middle French arangier, equivalent to a- a-5 + rangier to range
Related forms
arrangeable, adjective
arranger, noun
overarrange, verb, overarranged, overarranging.
rearrange, verb, rearranged, rearranging.
rearrangeable, adjective
unarranged, adjective
well-arranged, adjective
Synonyms
1. array; group, sort, dispose; classify.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for rearrange
  • Professors can rearrange the order of the included lessons or replace them with their own work.
  • Others have thought about these things carefully and some have decided to rearrange their life priorities.
  • Demographic shifts rearrange patterns of population and create new human landscapes.
  • Most chose to sit idly-unless they were given the chance to rearrange the beads instead of to rebuild it as it was.
  • We as a society seem to have little regard for events that, while influential, do not completely rearrange our lifestyle.
  • We need to reduce our dependence on the unstable mid-east not rearrange the deck chairs.
  • When the operator moves one robot out of the group, the rest rearrange themselves to make up for its loss.
  • My position is this: invest in prevention and rearrange the carrots and sticks for those who do end up on welfare.
  • The next day or the next week she would rearrange the names, the order, the characteristics.
  • The entries will automatically be organized in the order that you added them to the reading list, unless you rearrange them.
British Dictionary definitions for rearrange

rearrange

/ˌriːəˈreɪndʒ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to put (something) into a new order: to rearrange the lighting
2.
to put (something) back in its original order after it has been displaced
3.
to fix a new date or time for (something postponed): to rearrange a match
Derived Forms
rearranger, noun
rearrangement, noun

arrange

/əˈreɪndʒ/
verb
1.
(transitive) to put into a proper, systematic, or decorative order
2.
(transitive; may take a clause as object or an infinitive) to arrive at an agreement or understanding about; settle
3.
when intr, often foll by (when transitive, may take a clause as object or an infinitive) for. to make plans or preparations in advance (for something): we arranged for her to be met
4.
(transitive) to adapt (a musical composition) for performance in a different way, esp on different instruments
5.
(transitive) to adapt (a play, etc) for broadcasting
6.
(intransitive) often foll by with. to come to an agreement
Derived Forms
arrangeable, adjective
arranger, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French arangier, from a-² + rangier to put in a row, range
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for rearrange

arrange

v.

late 14c., "draw up a line of battle," from Old French arengier (12c.), from a- "to" (see ad-) + rangier "set in a row" (Modern French ranger), from rang "rank," from Frankish *hring (see rank (n.)).

A rare word until the meaning generalized to "to place things in order" c.1780-1800. Musical sense of "adapt for other instruments or voices" is from 1808. Related: Arranged; arranging. Arranged marriage attested from 1854.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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