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recast

[v. ree-kast, -kahst; n. ree-kast, -kahst] /v. riˈkæst, -ˈkɑst; n. ˈriˌkæst, -ˌkɑst/
verb (used with object), recast, recasting.
1.
to cast again or anew.
2.
to form, fashion, or arrange again.
3.
to remodel or reconstruct (a literary work, document, sentence, etc.).
4.
to supply (a theater or opera work) with a new cast.
noun
5.
a recasting.
6.
a new form produced by recasting.
Origin
1890-1895
1890-95; re- + cast
Related forms
recaster, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for recast
  • When a writer detects a fault in what he has written or thought of writing, his best course is to recast the whole sentence.
  • For example, knowledge-an intangible, abstract concept-is often recast in terms of the concrete experience of sight.
  • In other words, they recast the past to better suit their own view of the world.
  • When he woke up the next day, he found that his editors had recast the story.
  • B ut let's recast the story as a triumphal, even uplifting tale of pluck and achievement.
  • He is making a deliberate attempt to recast his father's reputation-from merciless thug to enlightened buccaneer.
  • The date of withdrawal should be recast as a time for reduction to a lighter, more sustainable, and more permanent presence.
  • Facts are mere materiel meant to be invented, discarded, smelted and recast in service of the cause.
  • Marigolds and petunias were recast as blazing comets or flying saucers in outer space.
  • Fisher recast the question as a mathematical problem.
British Dictionary definitions for recast

recast

/riːˈkɑːst/
verb (transitive) -casts, -casting, -cast
1.
(often foll by as) to give (someone or something) a new role, function, or character: recast themselves as moderate and kind
2.
(often foll by as) to cast (an actor or actress) again or in a different part
3.
to cast new actors or actresses for a production of (a play, film, etc)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for recast
v.

c.1600, from re- + cast (v.). Of literary works and other writing, from 1790. Theater sense is from 1951.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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