recompense

[rek-uhm-pens]
verb (used with object), recompensed, recompensing.
1.
to repay; remunerate; reward, as for service, aid, etc.
2.
to pay or give compensation for; make restitution or requital for (damage, injury, or the like).
verb (used without object), recompensed, recompensing.
3.
to make compensation for something; repay someone: no attempt to recompense for our trouble.
noun
4.
compensation, as for an injury, wrong, etc.: to make recompense for the loss one's carelessness has caused.
5.
a repayment or requital, as for favors, gifts, etc.
6.
a remuneration or reward, as for services, aid, or the like.

Origin:
1375–1425; (v.) late Middle English < Middle French recompenser < Late Latin recompēnsāre, equivalent to Latin re- re- + compēnsāre (see compensate); (noun) late Middle English < Middle French, derivative of recompenser

recompensable, adjective
recompenser, noun
underrecompense, verb (used with object), underrecompensed, underrecompensing, noun
unrecompensable, adjective
unrecompensed, adjective


1. reimburse, recoup. 4. payment, amends, indemnification, satisfaction. 4–6. See reward.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
recompense (ˈrɛkəmˌpɛns)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to pay or reward for service, work, etc
2.  (tr) to compensate for loss, injury, etc
 
n
3.  compensation for loss, injury, etc: to make recompense
4.  reward, remuneration, or repayment
 
[C15: from Old French recompenser, from Latin re- + compensāre to balance in weighing; see compensate]
 
'recompensable
 
adj
 
'recompenser
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

recompense
late 14c. (recompensation), from O.Fr. recompense (13c.), from L.L. recompensare, from L. re- "again" + compensare "balance out," lit. "weigh together" (see compensate). The verb is attested from 1422.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Their pains were abundantly recompensed by the great progress which he made.
The inventor should be recompensed for the contribution he or she has made to
  society and for her genius, time, and effort.
It truly eliminates the burden on interstate commerce, since any burden on
  commerce would be recompensed in a mandatory system.
While dismissed workers may be financially recompensed, they were rarely
  reinstated.
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