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composed

[kuh m-pohzd] /kəmˈpoʊzd/
adjective
1.
calm; tranquil; serene:
His composed face reassured the nervous passengers.
Origin
1475-1485
1475-85; compose + -ed2
Related forms
composedly
[kuh m-poh-zid-lee] /kəmˈpoʊ zɪd li/ (Show IPA),
adverb
composedness, noun
uncomposed, adjective
well-composed, adjective
Synonyms
See calm.
Antonyms
agitated, perturbed.

compose

[kuh m-pohz] /kəmˈpoʊz/
verb (used with object), composed, composing.
1.
to make or form by combining things, parts, or elements:
He composed his speech from many research notes.
2.
to be or constitute a part or element of:
a rich sauce composed of many ingredients.
3.
to make up or form the basis of:
Style composes the essence of good writing.
4.
to put or dispose in proper form or order:
to compose laws into a coherent system.
5.
Art. to organize the parts or elements of (a picture or the like).
6.
to create (a musical, literary, or choreographic work).
7.
to end or settle (a quarrel, dispute, etc.):
The union and management composed their differences.
8.
to bring (oneself, one's mind, etc.) to a condition of calmness, repose, etc.; calm; quiet.
9.
Printing.
  1. to set (type).
  2. to set type for (an article, book, etc.).
verb (used without object), composed, composing.
10.
to engage in composition, especially musical composition.
11.
to enter into composition; fall into an arrangement:
a scene that composes well.
Origin
1375-1425; late Middle English < Middle French composer. See com-, pose1
Related forms
composable, adjective
uncomposable, adjective
Can be confused
compose, comprise (see usage note at comprise)
Synonyms
8. settle, collect.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for composed
  • The illusion works because the left face is composed of a high spatial frequency angry face with a calm face in low spatial.
  • Imagine trying to remain calm and composed while working in the middle of a war zone, a natural disaster, or other crisis.
  • Remain calm and composed when interacting and set the tone.
  • Each brigade was composed of four regiments, in all fifty-six regiments of infantry.
  • Most people learned in school that these particles are atoms, composed of neutrons, protons and electrons.
  • Galaxies are sprawling space systems composed of dust, gas, and countless stars.
  • They are extremely dim and composed mostly of dark matter.
  • Each song is composed of anywhere from two to nine themes, and the themes are sung in a specific order.
  • All that last-minute stirring may make for great risotto, but it hardly makes for a composed host.
  • Its atmosphere is composed of hydrogen and small amounts of helium and methane.
British Dictionary definitions for composed

composed

/kəmˈpəʊzd/
adjective
1.
(of people) calm; tranquil; serene
Derived Forms
composedly (kəmˈpəʊzɪdlɪ) adverb
composedness, noun

compose

/kəmˈpəʊz/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
to put together or make up by combining; put in proper order
2.
to be the component elements of
3.
to produce or create (a musical or literary work)
4.
(intransitive) to write music
5.
to calm (someone, esp oneself); make quiet
6.
to adjust or settle (a quarrel, etc)
7.
to order the elements of (a painting, sculpture, etc); design
8.
(printing) to set up (type)
Word Origin
C15: from Old French composer, from Latin compōnere to put in place; see component
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for composed
adj.

"calm, tranquil," c.1600, past participle adjective frome compose (v.). Related: Composedly; composedness.

compose

v.

c.1400, compousen, from Old French composer "put together, arrange, write" a work (12c.), from com- "with" (see com-) + poser "to place," from Late Latin pausare "to cease, lay down," ultimately from Latin ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). Meaning influenced in Old French by componere (see composite). Musical sense is from 1590s. Related: Composed; composing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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