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[rek-uh n-sahyl] /ˈrɛk ənˌsaɪl/
verb (used with object), reconciled, reconciling.
to cause (a person) to accept or be resigned to something not desired:
He was reconciled to his fate.
to win over to friendliness; cause to become amicable:
to reconcile hostile persons.
to compose or settle (a quarrel, dispute, etc.).
to bring into agreement or harmony; make compatible or consistent:
to reconcile differing statements; to reconcile accounts.
to reconsecrate (a desecrated church, cemetery, etc.).
to restore (an excommunicate or penitent) to communion in a church.
verb (used without object), reconciled, reconciling.
to become reconciled.
Origin of reconcile
1300-50; Middle English reconcilen < Latin reconciliāre to make good again, repair. See re-, conciliate
Related forms
reconcilement, noun
reconciler, noun
reconcilingly, adverb
prereconcile, verb (used with object), prereconciled, prereconciling.
prereconcilement, noun
quasi-reconciled, adjective
unreconciled, adjective
unreconciling, adjective
2. pacify, propitiate, placate. 4. harmonize.
3. anger. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for reconcile
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • In the meantime he strove hard to reconcile the antagonists.

  • But how is he to reconcile the fact with the truth in his case?

    The Book of Khalid Ameen Rihani
  • But Flamborough was of all the wide world happiest in possessing an authority to reconcile all doubts.

    Mary Anerley R. D. Blackmore
  • I can not, to save my soul and yours, reconcile these contradictions.

    The Book of Khalid Ameen Rihani
  • It is, of course, impossible to reconcile these mutually exclusive abstractions either in theory or in practice.

    The Behavior of Crowds Everett Dean Martin
British Dictionary definitions for reconcile


verb (transitive)
(often passive) usually foll by to. to make (oneself or another) no longer opposed; cause to acquiesce in something unpleasant: she reconciled herself to poverty
to become friendly with (someone) after estrangement or to re-establish friendly relations between (two or more people)
to settle (a quarrel or difference)
to make (two apparently conflicting things) compatible or consistent with each other
to reconsecrate (a desecrated church, etc)
Derived Forms
reconcilement, noun
reconciler, noun
reconciliation (ˌrɛkənˌsɪlɪˈeɪʃən) noun
reconciliatory (ˌrɛkənˈsɪlɪətərɪ; -trɪ) adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Latin reconciliāre to bring together again, from re- + conciliāre to make friendly, conciliate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for reconcile

mid-14c., of persons, from Old French reconcilier (12c.) and directly from Latin reconcilare "to bring together again; regain; win over again, conciliate," from re- "again" (see re-) + concilare "make friendly" (see conciliate). Reflexive sense is recorded from 1530s. Meaning "to make (discordant facts or statements) consistent" is from late 14c. Intransitive sense of "become reconciled" is from 1660s. Related: Reconciled; reconciling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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