re-count

[v. ree-kount; n. ree-kount, ree-kount]

Origin:
1755–65; re- + count1

re-count, recount.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

recount

[ri-kount]
verb (used with object)
1.
to relate or narrate; tell in detail; give the facts or particulars of.
2.
to narrate in order.
3.
to tell one by one; enumerate.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English recounten < Middle French reconter, equivalent to re- re- + conter to tell, count1

1. recant, recount ; 2. re-count, recount.


1. describe. See relate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
recount (rɪˈkaʊnt)
 
vb
(tr) to tell the story or details of; narrate
 
[C15: from Old French reconter, from re- + conter to tell, relate; see count1]
 
re'countal
 
n

re-count
 
vb
1.  to count (votes, etc) again
 
n
2.  a second or further count, esp of votes in a closely contested election

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

recount
1456, from M.Fr. reconter, from O.Fr. re- "again" + conter "to relate, reckon" (see count (v.)). The noun meaning "a new count" (especially in an election) is from 1884.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Each single-author book is immensely particular, a story told as only one storyteller could recount it.
There are few chapters of human history which recount a grander story of human achievement.
Many high school counselors can recount some variant on the following story.
Through the years he would recount that story hundreds of times.
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