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refute

[ri-fyoot] /rɪˈfyut/
verb (used with object), refuted, refuting.
1.
to prove to be false or erroneous, as an opinion or charge.
2.
to prove (a person) to be in error.
Origin
1505-1515
1505-15; < Latin refūtāre to check, suppress, refute, rebut, equivalent to re- re- + -fūtāre presumably, “to beat” (attested only with the prefixes con- and re-; cf. confute)
Related forms
refutable
[ri-fyoo-tuh-buh l, ref-yuh-tuh-] /rɪˈfyu tə bəl, ˈrɛf yə tə-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
refutability, noun
refutably, adverb
refuter, noun
self-refuted, adjective
self-refuting, adjective
unrefutable, adjective
unrefutably, adverb
unrefuted, adjective
unrefuting, adjective
Can be confused
deny, disapprove, disprove, rebut, refute (see synonym study at deny)
dispute, refute.
repudiate, refute, refudiate (see word story at refudiate)
Synonyms
1. disprove, rebut. 1, 2. confute.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for refute
  • Most refute the texts and offer ample evidence of their fraudulent nature.
  • It's good when someone else adds their two cents to refute an untruth.
  • The request for quantifiable data is reasonable: it helps to objectively verify or refute the opinion you quoted.
  • Yes, certainly, the surest way to refute an argument is by calling the other side names.
  • While any individual contribution can be criticised, it is more difficult to refute a large number all showing the same results.
  • The only way to settle this will be to confirm or refute the findings with better data.
  • How in your wrenched world of wrenched physics can one refute what he does not understand.
  • But it doesn't really refute the idea that loosestrife is damaging.
  • Regardless of what naysayers may still insist, the science on climate change is too robust to refute.
  • Additionally, these same scientists would not discuss or refute the science and facts presented.
British Dictionary definitions for refute

refute

/rɪˈfjuːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to prove (a statement, theory, charge, etc) of (a person) to be false or incorrect; disprove
2.
to deny (a claim, charge, allegation, etc)
Derived Forms
refutable (ˈrɛfjʊtəbəl; rɪˈfjuː-) adjective
refutability (ˌrɛfjʊtəˈbɪlɪtɪ; rɪˌfjuː-) noun
refutably, adverb
refuter, noun
Usage note
The use of refute to mean deny is thought by many people to be incorrect
Word Origin
C16: from Latin refūtāre to rebut
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for refute
v.

1510s, "refuse, reject," from Middle French réfuter (16c.) and directly from Latin refutare "drive back; rebut, disprove; repress, repel, resist, oppose," from re- "back" (see re-) + -futare "to beat," probably from PIE root *bhau- "to strike down" (see bat (n.1)).

Meaning "prove wrong" dates from 1540s. Since c.1964 linguists have frowned on the subtle shift in meaning towards "to deny," as it is used in connection with allegation. Related: Refuted; refuting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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