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rehabilitate

[ree-huh-bil-i-teyt, ree-uh-] /ˌri həˈbɪl ɪˌteɪt, ˌri ə-/
verb (used with object), rehabilitated, rehabilitating.
1.
to restore to a condition of good health, ability to work, or the like.
2.
to restore to good condition, operation, or management, as a bankrupt business.
3.
to reestablish the good reputation of (a person, one's character or name, etc.).
4.
to restore formally to former capacity, standing, rank, rights, or privileges.
verb (used without object), rehabilitated, rehabilitating.
5.
to undergo rehabilitation.
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; < Medieval Latin rehabilitātus, past participle of rehabilitāre to restore. See re-, habilitate
Related forms
rehabilitation, noun
rehabilitative, adjective
rehabilitator, noun
nonrehabilitation, noun
nonrehabilitative, adjective
unrehabilitated, adjective
Synonyms
2. salvage, restore, recondition, reconstruct, refurbish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for rehabilitate
  • Cobb said he would oppose any effort to rehabilitate the stories and the house if it was not done in a critical way.
  • See photos of this legendary canine and find out how you can help honor his legacy of helping to rehabilitate other dogs.
  • These unnatural fires don't put themselves out and the lands don't rehabilitate themselves.
  • The rule of thumb for both researchers boils down to a simple formula: rescue, rehabilitate and return.
  • He prepared to capture the pup and begin efforts to rehabilitate it for an eventual return to the wild.
  • In addition, it creates extra problems by using money that could be spent on other things on attempting to rehabilitate militants.
  • Without a doubt, fearful dogs are more difficult to rehabilitate than aggressive dogs.
  • He hires hundreds of ex-cons, vowing to rehabilitate them.
  • Tens of millions of dollars would be needed to rehabilitate the area.
  • The living turned into a valiant fight to survive and now to rehabilitate.
British Dictionary definitions for rehabilitate

rehabilitate

/ˌriːəˈbɪlɪˌteɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to help (a person who has acquired a disability or addiction or who has just been released from prison) to readapt to society or a new job, as by vocational guidance, retraining, or therapy
2.
to restore to a former position or rank
3.
to restore the good reputation of
Derived Forms
rehabilitative, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Medieval Latin rehabilitāre to restore, from re- + Latin habilitās skill, ability
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for rehabilitate
v.

1570s, "to bring back to a former condition after decay or damage," back-formation from rehabilitation and in part from Medieval Latin rehabilitatus, past participle of rehabilitare. Meaning "to restore one's reputation or character in the eyes of others" is from 1847. Related: Rehabilitated; rehabilitating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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rehabilitate in Medicine

rehabilitate re·ha·bil·i·tate (rē'hə-bĭl'ĭ-tāt')
v. re·ha·bil·i·tat·ed, re·ha·bil·i·tat·ing, re·ha·bil·i·tates

  1. To restore to good health or useful life, as through therapy and education.

  2. To restore to good condition, operation, or capacity.


re'ha·bil'i·ta'tion n.
re'ha·bil'i·ta'tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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