Try Our Apps


Supposedly vs. Supposably


[rel-i-geyt] /ˈrɛl ɪˌgeɪt/
verb (used with object), relegated, relegating.
to send or consign to an inferior position, place, or condition:
He has been relegated to a post at the fringes of the diplomatic service.
to consign or commit (a matter, task, etc.), as to a person:
He relegates the less pleasant tasks to his assistant.
to assign or refer (something) to a particular class or kind.
to send into exile; banish.
Origin of relegate
late Middle English
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin relēgātus, past participle of relēgāre to send away, dispatch. See re-, legate
Related forms
[rel-i-guh-buh l] /ˈrɛl ɪ gə bəl/ (Show IPA),
relegation, noun
unrelegable, adjective
unrelegated, adjective
2. delegate, entrust. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for relegate
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • This doubt alone could explain the corps' decision to relegate the units to the backwaters of the war zone.

  • All good Americans, we are told, relegate the sojourn to a more distant future.

    The Slave Of The Lamp Henry Seton Merriman
  • I'll not give him too hard or too unpleasant employment, not relegate him to Britain or Dacia or Syria.

    The Unwilling Vestal Edward Lucas White
  • To begin with, we must relegate Selection to its proper place.

  • Indeed, the Americans are the only people who relegate the dance to the young alone.

    The Art of Entertaining M. E. W. Sherwood
  • But this does not relegate these civilized nations to savagism.

    The Prehistoric World E. A. Allen
British Dictionary definitions for relegate


verb (transitive)
to move to a position of less authority, importance, etc; demote
(usually passive) (mainly Brit) to demote (a football team, etc) to a lower division
to assign or refer (a matter) to another or others, as for action or decision
(foll by to) to banish or exile
to assign (something) to a particular group or category
Derived Forms
relegatable, adjective
relegation, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin relēgāre to send away, from re- + lēgāre to send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for relegate

1590s "to banish, send into exile," from Latin relegatus, past participle of relegare "remove, dismiss, banish, send away, schedule, put aside," from re- "back" (see re-) + legare "send with a commission" (see legate). Meaning "place in a position of inferiority" is recorded from 1790. Related: Relegated; relegating; relegable.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for relegate

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for relegate

Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for relegate