reluctance

[ri-luhk-tuhns]
noun
1.
unwillingness; disinclination: reluctance to speak in public.
2.
Electricity. the resistance to magnetic flux offered by a magnetic circuit, determined by the permeability and arrangement of the materials of the circuit.
Also, reluctancy.


Origin:
1635–45; reluct(ant) + -ance

prereluctance, noun
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World English Dictionary
reluctance or (less commonly) reluctancy (rɪˈlʌktəns)
 
n
1.  lack of eagerness or willingness; disinclination
2.  physics a measure of the resistance of a closed magnetic circuit to a magnetic flux, equal to the ratio of the magnetomotive force to the magnetic flux
 
reluctancy or (less commonly) reluctancy
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

reluctance
1640s, "act of struggling against," from obsolete verb reluct "to struggle or rebel against" (1520s), from L. reluctari "to struggle against," from re- "against" + luctari "to struggle." Meaning "unwillingness" is first attested 1660s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Now one can guess at the reasons for the reluctance of academics to think
  seriously about policing one another.
Falling sales are discouraging hiring, which is adding to consumers' reluctance
  to spend.
The guard's reluctance to let the foreigner continue on is understandable.
But the question of self-disclosure goes deeper than mere willingness or
  reluctance.
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