remorse

[ri-mawrs]
noun
1.
deep and painful regret for wrongdoing; compunction.
2.
Obsolete. pity; compassion.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Middle French remors < Medieval Latin remorsus, equivalent to Latin remord(ere) to bite again, vex, nag (re- re- + mordere to bite) + -tus suffix of v. action, with dt > s; see mordant

preremorse, noun


1. contrition. See regret.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
remorse (rɪˈmɔːs)
 
n
1.  a sense of deep regret and guilt for some misdeed
2.  compunction; pity; compassion
 
[C14: from Medieval Latin remorsus a gnawing, from Latin remordēre to bite again, from re- + mordēre to bite]
 
re'morseful
 
adj
 
re'morsefully
 
adv
 
re'morsefulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

remorse
late 14c., from O.Fr. remors (Fr. remords), from M.L. remorsum, from neut. pp. of L. remordere "to vex, disturb," lit. "to bite back," from re- "again" + mordere "to bite" (see smart (v.)). The sense evolution was via the M.L. phrase remorsus conscientiæ (translated
into M.E. as ayenbite of inwit).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Trying to keep everyone talking while trying to keep him alive because of his
  total lack of remorse or fear, is a full time job.
No doubt she felt relief at having been fired, what she seems not to have felt
  is remorse at having been hired.
It has no empathy, refuses to accept responsibility for its actions and feels
  no remorse.
Psychopaths lie without compunction, injure without remorse, and cheat with
  little fear of detection.
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