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remote

[ri-moht] /rɪˈmoʊt/
adjective, remoter, remotest.
1.
far apart; far distant in space; situated at some distance away:
the remote jungles of Brazil.
2.
out-of-the-way; secluded:
a remote village; a remote mountaintop.
3.
distant in time:
remote antiquity.
4.
distant in relationship or connection:
a remote ancestor.
5.
operating or controlled from a distance, as by remote control:
a remote telephone answering machine.
6.
far off; abstracted; removed:
principles remote from actions.
7.
not direct, primary, or proximate; not directly involved or influential:
the remote causes of the war.
8.
slight or faint; unlikely:
not the remotest idea; a remote chance.
9.
reserved and distant in manner; aloof; not warmly cordial.
noun
10.
Radio and Television. a broadcast, usually live, from a location outside a studio.
11.
remote control (def 2).
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin remōtus, past participle of removēre to move back; see remove, motion
Related forms
remotely, adverb
remoteness, noun
unremote, adjective
unremotely, adverb
unremoteness, noun
Synonyms
2. sequestered, isolated, removed, apart, solitary. 8. inconsiderable. 9. withdrawn.
Antonyms
1. close, near.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for remotely
  • They never showed any sign that they would even remotely consider me as prey.
  • If you're even remotely interested, feel free to shoot me an e mail.
  • Look in the contract and see if there is really anything that might remotely suggest what they are arguing.
  • It is not, however, remotely the same as being an actual instructor of entire courses.
  • They are incapable of remotely sensing the oxygen level of the blood.
  • The avatars of two of his students, both of whom were participating remotely, entered the room to treat the patient.
  • It's the latest example of scientists using cellphones to help diagnose diseases remotely.
  • There is only one professor in the department who does anything even remotely close to my topic.
  • Also a lot of the observations come from satellites anyway so you are already doing things remotely anyway.
  • The researchers also want to develop repair methods that can allow service providers to cure infected phones remotely.
British Dictionary definitions for remotely

remote

/rɪˈməʊt/
adjective
1.
located far away; distant
2.
far from any centre of population, society, or civilization; out-of-the-way
3.
distant in time
4.
distantly related or connected: a remote cousin
5.
removed, as from the source or point of action
6.
slight or faint (esp in the phrases not the remotest idea, a remote chance)
7.
(of a person's manner) aloof or abstracted
8.
operated from a distance; remote-controlled: a remote monitor
Derived Forms
remotely, adverb
remoteness, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin remōtus far removed, from removēre, from re- + movēre to move
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for remotely

remote

adj.

mid-15c., from Middle French remot or directly from Latin remotus "afar off, remote, distant in place," past participle of removere "move back or away" (see remove (v.)). Related: Remotely; remoteness. Remote control "fact of controlling from a distance" is recorded from 1904; as a device which allows this from 1920.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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