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replace

[ri-pleys] /rɪˈpleɪs/
verb (used with object), replaced, replacing.
1.
to assume the former role, position, or function of; substitute for (a person or thing):
Electricity has replaced gas in lighting.
2.
to provide a substitute or equivalent in the place of:
to replace a broken dish.
3.
to restore; return; make good:
to replace a sum of money borrowed.
4.
to restore to a former or the proper place:
to replace the vase on the table.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; re- + place
Related forms
replaceable, adjective
replaceability, noun
replacer, noun
nonreplaceable, adjective
quasi-replaced, adjective
unreplaceable, adjective
unreplaced, adjective
well-replaced, adjective
Synonyms
1. succeed. Replace, supersede, supplant refer to putting one thing or person in place of another. To replace is to take the place of, to succeed: Ms. Jones will replace Mr. Smith as president. Supersede implies that that which is replacing another is an improvement: The computer has superseded the typewriter. Supplant implies that that which takes the other's place has ousted the former holder and usurped the position or function, especially by art or fraud: to supplant a former favorite. 3. refund, repay.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for replace
  • If the bare patch doesn't fill in on its own, reseed it or replace it with a patch of sod.
  • When you start down the road where belief and magic replace evidence and science, you end up in a place you don't want to be.
  • The only practical solution is to replace the whole set of steps.
  • Bureaucrats may well start to replace bankers as a public target of opprobrium.
  • But the deeper layers of skin, called the dermis, do not go through this cellular turnover and so do not replace themselves.
  • Or you can plant wildflowers-even replace your concrete driveway.
  • Ankle replacement is surgery to replace the damaged parts of the three bones that make up the ankle joint.
  • Porcupines grow new quills to replace the ones they lose.
  • Electronic books are still far too crude to replace ink and paper.
  • My favorite solution is to replace your lawn with a meadow.
British Dictionary definitions for replace

replace

/rɪˈpleɪs/
verb (transitive)
1.
to take the place of; supersede: the manual worker is being replaced by the machine
2.
to substitute a person or thing for (another which has ceased to fulfil its function); put in place of: to replace an old pair of shoes
3.
to put back or return; restore to its rightful place
Derived Forms
replaceable, adjective
replaceability, noun
replacer, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for replace
v.

1590s, "to restore to a previous place or position," from re- "back, again" + place (v.). Meaning "to take the place of" is recorded from 1753; that of "to fill the place of (with something else)" is from 1765. Related: Replaced; replacing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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