reprehensible

[rep-ri-hen-suh-buhl]
adjective
deserving of reproof, rebuke, or censure; blameworthy.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin reprehēnsibilis, equivalent to Latin reprehēns(us) (past participle of reprehendere to reprehend) + -ibilis -ible

reprehensibility, reprehensibleness, noun
reprehensibly, adverb
nonreprehensibility, noun
nonreprehensible, adjective
nonreprehensibleness, noun
nonreprehensibly, adverb
unreprehensible, adjective
unreprehensibleness, noun
unreprehensibly, adverb


culpable.


praiseworthy.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
reprehensible (ˌrɛprɪˈhɛnsəbəl)
 
adj
open to criticism or rebuke; blameworthy
 
[C14: from Late Latin reprehensibilis, from Latin reprehendere to hold back, reprove; see reprehend]
 
reprehensi'bility
 
n
 
repre'hensibleness
 
n
 
repre'hensibly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

reprehensible
late 14c., from L.L. reprehensibilis, from reprehens-, pp. stem of reprehendere (see reprehend).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
To ignore the sin of lying and blame someone who is trying to cut through the
  veil of secrecy is reprehensible.
Giving everyone a chance to fail, or even a second chance, is by no means a
  reprehensible policy.
Exploiting an event to further an agenda is not in itself reprehensible.
Finally shareholders are becoming incensed by these reprehensible bonuses and
  severance packages.
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