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resent

[ri-zent] /rɪˈzɛnt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to feel or show displeasure or indignation at (a person, act, remark, etc.) from a sense of injury or insult.
Origin of resent
1595-1605
1595-1605; < French ressentir to be angry < Old French resentir, equivalent to re- re- + sentir to feel < Latin sentīre; see sense
Related forms
resentingly, adverb
resentive, adjective
unresented, adjective
unresenting, adjective
Can be confused
begrudge, regret, resent (see synonym study at regret)

resend

[ree-send] /riˈsɛnd/
verb (used with object), resent, resending.
1.
to send again.
2.
to send back.
Origin
1545-55; re- + send1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for resent
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He was angry with Dolly still, angry with her mother, and ready to resent their reproaches.

    Old Kensington Miss Thackeray
  • The mitigation of that horror they condemn, resent, and often ascribe to the devil.

  • I fail to see the necessity of (and, accordingly, I resent bitterly) all these coral-reef methods.

    Anticipations Herbert George Wells
  • He followed her, and, because they were old neighbors, she did not resent it when he put his hand on her shoulder.

    K Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • Now, I resent the romantic idea that marriage should be a hazardous mystery—at least to the woman.

    Women's Wild Oats C. Gasquoine Hartley
British Dictionary definitions for resent

resent

/rɪˈzɛnt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to feel bitter, indignant, or aggrieved at
Word Origin
C17: from French ressentir, from re- + sentir to feel, from Latin sentīre to perceive; see sense
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for resent
v.

"take (something) ill; be in some degree angry or provoked at," c.1600, from French ressentir "feel pain, regret," from Old French resentir "feel again, feel in turn" (13c.), from re-, intensive prefix, + sentir "to feel," from Latin sentire (see sense (n.)). Related: Resented; resenting.

resend

v.

1550s, from re- + send. Related: Resent; resending.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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