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restaurant

[res-ter-uh nt, -tuh-rahnt, -trahnt] /ˈrɛs tər ənt, -təˌrɑnt, -trɑnt/
noun
1.
an establishment where meals are served to customers.
Origin
1820-1830
1820-30, Americanism; < French, noun use of present participle of restaurer < Latin restaurāre to restore
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for restaurant
  • On any given day every restaurant, household and business throws away paper, oil and food.
  • He said to stay in business these days every restaurant must cater to tourists.
  • Business is frequently conducted over lunch, and the safest option is a restaurant in a five-star hotel.
  • Plates are not provided at this sushi restaurant, as the food is served directly on a counter.
  • He sits in a restaurant and sends his food back three times.
  • Interactive effects of reward sensitivity and residential fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption.
  • Head out on cross-country skis or chat with locals over wild sockeye salmon in the restaurant.
  • Though popular with tourists, the beachside restaurant is in a great spot.
  • Counting calories today is as easy as checking the label in a grocery store, or perusing the menu in a restaurant.
  • Even if you have a light hand with the salt shaker, you probably get lots of sodium in processed or restaurant meals.
British Dictionary definitions for restaurant

restaurant

/ˈrɛstəˌrɒŋ; ˈrɛstrɒŋ; -rɒnt/
noun
1.
a commercial establishment where meals are prepared and served to customers
Word Origin
C19: from French, from restaurer to restore
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for restaurant
n.

1821, from French restaurant "a restaurant," originally "food that restores," noun use of present participle of restaurer "to restore or refresh," from Old French restorer (see restore).

In 1765 a man by the name of Boulanger, also known as "Champ d'Oiseaux" or "Chantoiseau," opened a shop near the Louvre (on either the rue des Poulies or the rue Bailleul, depending on which authority one chooses to believe). There he sold what he called restaurants or bouillons restaurants--that is, meat-based consommés intended to "restore" a person's strength. Ever since the Middle Ages the word restaurant had been used to describe any of a variety of rich bouillons made with chicken, beef, roots of one sort or another, onions, herbs, and, according to some recipes, spices, crystallized sugar, toasted bread, barley, butter, and even exotic ingredients such as dried rose petals, Damascus grapes, and amber. In order to entice customers into his shop, Boulanger had inscribed on his window a line from the Gospels: "Venite ad me omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego vos restaurabo." He was not content simply to serve bouillon, however. He also served leg of lamb in white sauce, thereby infringing the monopoly of the caterers' guild. The guild filed suit, which to everyone's astonishment ended in a judgment in favor of Boulanger. [Jean-Robert Pitte, "The Rise of the Restaurant," in "Food: A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present," English editor Albert Sonnenfeld, transl. Clarissa Botsford, 1999, Columbia University Press]
Italian spelling ristorante attested in English by 1925.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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