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restaurant

[res-ter-uh nt, -tuh-rahnt, -trahnt] /ˈrɛs tər ənt, -təˌrɑnt, -trɑnt/
noun
1.
an establishment where meals are served to customers.
Origin
1820-1830
1820-30, Americanism; < French, noun use of present participle of restaurer < Latin restaurāre to restore
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for restaurants
  • Ask students where restaurants that serve pizza are located in your community and why they are located where they are.
  • While you're shopping at the farmers market, ask growers which restaurants they work with.
  • Often, neighborhood restaurants will stay open late and offer discounts as well.
  • Once you give up meat, you may realize how few options you have at restaurants or how much you miss a freshly grilled hamburger.
  • The city features major retailers, numerous restaurants and internationally recognized wineries.
  • And this is in addition to fine wining and dining offered in fancy museum cafes and restaurants.
  • At good restaurants, the chef takes this as a challenge rather than as an annoyance.
  • There are a ton of parks and outdoor activities to do, and there are some pretty decent restaurants too.
  • Some restaurants do not highlight the included gratuity when charged.
  • More students select colleges in the same way they select restaurants.
British Dictionary definitions for restaurants

restaurant

/ˈrɛstəˌrɒŋ; ˈrɛstrɒŋ; -rɒnt/
noun
1.
a commercial establishment where meals are prepared and served to customers
Word Origin
C19: from French, from restaurer to restore
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for restaurants

restaurant

n.

1821, from French restaurant "a restaurant," originally "food that restores," noun use of present participle of restaurer "to restore or refresh," from Old French restorer (see restore).

In 1765 a man by the name of Boulanger, also known as "Champ d'Oiseaux" or "Chantoiseau," opened a shop near the Louvre (on either the rue des Poulies or the rue Bailleul, depending on which authority one chooses to believe). There he sold what he called restaurants or bouillons restaurants--that is, meat-based consommés intended to "restore" a person's strength. Ever since the Middle Ages the word restaurant had been used to describe any of a variety of rich bouillons made with chicken, beef, roots of one sort or another, onions, herbs, and, according to some recipes, spices, crystallized sugar, toasted bread, barley, butter, and even exotic ingredients such as dried rose petals, Damascus grapes, and amber. In order to entice customers into his shop, Boulanger had inscribed on his window a line from the Gospels: "Venite ad me omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego vos restaurabo." He was not content simply to serve bouillon, however. He also served leg of lamb in white sauce, thereby infringing the monopoly of the caterers' guild. The guild filed suit, which to everyone's astonishment ended in a judgment in favor of Boulanger. [Jean-Robert Pitte, "The Rise of the Restaurant," in "Food: A Culinary History from Antiquity to the Present," English editor Albert Sonnenfeld, transl. Clarissa Botsford, 1999, Columbia University Press]
Italian spelling ristorante attested in English by 1925.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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