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[ri-strik-shuh n] /rɪˈstrɪk ʃən/
something that restricts; a restrictive condition or regulation; limitation.
the act of restricting.
the state of being restricted.
Origin of restriction
late Middle English
1375-1425; late Middle English < Late Latin restrictiōn- (stem of restrictiō), equivalent to Latin restrict(us) (see restrict) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
nonrestriction, noun
overrestriction, noun
prerestriction, noun
prorestriction, adjective
self-restriction, noun
superrestriction, noun
1. rule, provision, reservation, restraint. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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British Dictionary definitions for restriction


something that restricts; a restrictive measure, law, etc
the act of restricting or the state of being restricted
(logic, maths) a condition that imposes a constraint on the possible values of a variable or on the domain of arguments of a function
Derived Forms
restrictionist, noun, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for restriction

early 15c., "that which restricts," from Middle French restriction (14c.) and directly from Late Latin restrictionem (nominative restrictio) "limitation," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin restringere "restrict, bind fast, restrain," from re- "back" (see re-) + stringere "draw tight" (see strain (v.)). Meaning "act of restricting" is from 1620s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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restriction in Technology

A bug or design error that limits a program's capabilities, and which is sufficiently egregious that nobody can quite work up enough nerve to describe it as a feature. Often used (especially by marketroid types) to make it sound as though some crippling bogosity had been intended by the designers all along, or was forced upon them by arcane technical constraints of a nature no mere user could possibly comprehend (these claims are almost invariably false).
Old-time hacker Joseph M. Newcomer advises that whenever choosing a quantifiable but arbitrary restriction, you should make it either a power of 2 or a power of 2 minus 1. If you impose a limit of 17 items in a list, everyone will know it is a random number - on the other hand, a limit of 15 or 16 suggests some deep reason (involving 0- or 1-based indexing in binary) and you will get less flamage for it. Limits which are round numbers in base 10 are always especially suspect.
[Jargon File]

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010
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