roached

roach

3 [rohch]
noun
1.
Nautical.
a.
the upward curve at the foot of a square sail.
b.
(loosely) a convexity given to any of the edges of a sail; round.
2.
hair combed up from the forehead or temples in a roll or high curve.
verb (used with object)
3.
to clip or cut off (the mane of a horse); hog.
4.
to comb (hair) into a roach.

Origin:
1785–95; origin uncertain

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To roached
Collins
World English Dictionary
roach1 (rəʊtʃ)
 
n , pl roaches, roach
1.  a European freshwater cyprinid food fish, Rutilus rutilus, having a deep compressed body and reddish ventral and tail fins
2.  any of various similar fishes
 
[C14: from Old French roche, of obscure origin]

roach2 (rəʊtʃ)
 
n
1.  short for cockroach
2.  slang the butt of a cannabis cigarette

roach3 (rəʊtʃ)
 
n
1.  the amount by which the leech of a fore-and-aft sail projects beyond an imaginary straight line between the clew and the head
2.  the curve at the foot of a square sail
 
[C18: of unknown origin]

Roach (rəʊtʃ)
 
n
Hal, full name Harald Eugene Roach. 1892--1992, US film producer, whose company produced numerous comedy films in the 1920s and 1930s, including those featuring Harold Lloyd and Laurel and Hardy

roached (rəʊtʃt)
 
adj
arched convexly, as the back of certain breeds of dog, such as the whippet
 
[C19: from roach³ or roach (vb) to cut (a sail) into a roach]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

roach
1837, shortened form of cockroach (q.v.), in contemporary writing said to be from a polite desire to avoid the sexual connotation in the first syllable; meaning "butt of a marijuana cigarette" is first recorded 1938, perhaps from resemblance to the insect, but perhaps a different word entirely.

roach
"small freshwater fish," early 14c., from O.Fr. roche (13c.), perhaps from a Germanic source.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature