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rover1

[roh-ver] /ˈroʊ vər/
noun
1.
a person who roves; wanderer.
2.
Archery.
  1. a mark selected at random, as in a competition between two archers wandering over a specified area.
  2. one of a group of fixed marks at a long distance.
  3. an archer who shoots at such a mark.
3.
Croquet. a ball that has been driven through all the arches and needs only to strike the last peg to be out of the game.
4.
British.
  1. (at concerts or the like) a person who has a ticket for standing room only.
  2. a senior boy scout, 18 years of age or older.
Origin
1490-1500
1490-1500; rove1 + -er1

rover2

[roh-ver] /ˈroʊ vər/
noun
1.
a pirate.
2.
Obsolete. a pirate ship.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English < Middle Dutch or Middle Low German: robber, equivalent to roven to rob, reave1 + -er -er1

rover3

[roh-ver] /ˈroʊ vər/
noun
1.
a roving or routing machine.
2.
a roving-machine operator.
Origin
1735-45; rove3 + -er1

Rover

[roh-ver] /ˈroʊ vər/
noun
1.
a familiar name for a dog.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for rover
  • Then consider the size of the stage that would have been needed for the rover to run around in.
  • Some speculated that the rover had fallen into a crater or parked in such a way as to render the reflector inaccessible.
  • The cost of producing aerogel outweighs the benefits of its use as a replacement for mechanical parts on a space rover.
  • He leaves the lunar base station to make a repair, only to be injured when he crashes his rover.
  • The seabed rover rolls into the belly of the main carrier and the mini-sub attaches to the back.
  • Spirit is a rover no more and is, instead, now a stationary research platform.
British Dictionary definitions for rover

rover1

/ˈrəʊvə/
noun
1.
a person who roves; wanderer
2.
(archery) a mark selected at random for use as a target
3.
(croquet) a ball that has been driven through all the hoops but has not yet hit the winning peg
4.
(Australian rules football) one of the three players in the ruck, usually smaller than the other two, selected for his agility in play
5.
a small remote-controlled vehicle which roams over rough, esp extraterrestrial, terrain taking photographs, gathering rock and soil samples, etc
Word Origin
C15: from rove1

rover2

/ˈrəʊvə/
noun
1.
a pirate or pirate ship
Word Origin
C14: probably from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German, from roven to rob

rover3

/ˈrəʊvə/
noun
1.
a machine for roving wool, cotton, etc, or a person who operates such a machine
Word Origin
C18: from rove²

Rover

/ˈrəʊvə/
noun
1.
(Brit) the former name for Venture Scout
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for rover
n.

late 14c., "sea-robber, pirate," from Middle Dutch rover "robber, predator, plunderer," especially in zeerovere "pirate," literally "sea-robber," from roven "to rob," from Middle Dutch roof "spoil, plunder," related to Old English reaf "spoil, plunder," reafian "to reave" (see reave (v.)). Meaning "remote-controlled surface vehicle" is from 1970.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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8
9
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