rubber stamp

noun
1.
a device with a rubber printing surface that becomes coated with ink by being pressed on an ink-saturated pad, used for imprinting dates, addresses, standard designations or notices, etc., by hand.
2.
a person or government agency that gives approval automatically or routinely.
3.
such approval.

Origin:
1885–90

Dictionary.com Unabridged

rubber-stamp

[ruhb-er-stamp]
verb (used with object)
1.
to imprint with a rubber stamp.
2.
to give approval automatically or without consideration: to rubber-stamp the president's proposals.
adjective
3.
tending to give approval automatically or without due consideration: a rubber-stamp Congress that passed all the president's bills.

Origin:
1915–20; v. use of rubber stamp

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To rubber-stamp
Collins
World English Dictionary
rubber stamp
 
n
1.  a device used for imprinting dates or commonly used phrases on forms, invoices, etc
2.  automatic authorization of a payment, proposal, etc, without challenge
3.  a person who makes such automatic authorizations; a cipher or person of little account
 
vb
4.  to imprint (forms, invoices, etc) with a rubber stamp
5.  informal to approve automatically

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Example sentences
As long as the regulatory bodies continue to rubber-stamp these crops,
  exposures will be a run-away train.
Boards stacked with cronies too often still rubber-stamp excessively rich
  packages.
Parliament has become little more than a rubber-stamp.
Normally party congresses meet every five years to rubber-stamp decisions made
  by party leaders.
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