rumor

[roo-mer]
noun
1.
a story or statement in general circulation without confirmation or certainty as to facts: a rumor of war.
2.
gossip; hearsay: Don't listen to rumor.
3.
Archaic. a continuous, confused noise; clamor; din.
verb (used with object)
4.
to circulate, report, or assert by a rumor: It is rumored that the king is dead.
Also, especially British, rumour.


Origin:
1325–75; Middle English rumour < Middle French < Latin rūmor; akin to Sanskrit rāuti, rāvati (he) cries

unrumored, adjective


1. report.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rumour or (US) rumor (ˈruːmə)
 
n
1.  a.  information, often a mixture of truth and untruth, passed around verbally
 b.  (in combination): a rumour-monger
2.  gossip or hearsay
3.  archaic din or clamour
4.  obsolete fame or reputation
 
vb
5.  (tr; usually passive) to pass around or circulate in the form of a rumour: it is rumoured that the Queen is coming
6.  literary to make or cause to make a murmuring noise
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin rūmor common talk; related to Old Norse rymja to roar, Sanskrit rāut he cries]
 
rumor or (US) rumor
 
n
 
vb
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin rūmor common talk; related to Old Norse rymja to roar, Sanskrit rāut he cries]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rumor
late 14c., from O.Fr. rumour "widespread noise or report" (Fr. rumeur), from L. rumorem (nom. rumor) "noise, clamor, common talk, rumor," related to ravus "hoarse." The verb is recorded from 1858 in the sense "spread a rumor." Rumor mill is from 1973.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
All too often it seems rumour or ill-founded preconceptions become the basis for judgment.
If it helps you out, we'd be more than happy to start a celebrity rumour about
  you.
It adds nothing to the discussion since it has about the same weight as
  unsubstantiated rumour.
Perhaps the local constabulary should track down whoever it was that started
  the rumour about the meteorite causing the fire.
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