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rustic

[ruhs-tik] /ˈrʌs tɪk/
adjective
1.
of, pertaining to, or living in the country, as distinguished from towns or cities; rural.
2.
simple, artless, or unsophisticated.
3.
uncouth, rude, or boorish.
4.
made of roughly dressed limbs or roots of trees, as garden seats.
5.
(of stonework) having the surfaces rough or irregular and the joints sunken or beveled.
noun
6.
a country person.
7.
an unsophisticated country person.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Latin rūsticus, equivalent to rūs the country (see rural) + -ticus adj. suffix
Related forms
rustical, adjective
rustically, rusticly, adverb
rusticalness, rusticness, noun
nonrustic, adjective
nonrustically, adverb
unrustic, adjective
unrustically, adverb
Synonyms
1. See rural.
Antonyms
1. urban.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for rustic
  • Beachy sees no irony between his rustic, low-tech boyhood and a career spent developing new types of agricultural technologies.
  • With some rustic sourdough bread, it made a delicious appetizer for our dinner.
  • The protection of travelers' shrines and rustic prayers grows weak.
  • The programmers stayed in stilt-raised cabins and had their general sessions in a large, rustic room with a stone fireplace.
  • Thus the temptation is strong to supplement these few autobiographies by writing biographies of rustic or peasant characters.
  • The dining room is a perfect blend of rustic and modern, understated elegant.
  • To try a dinner for one of braised broccoli rabe on toasted slices of rustic bread, click here.
  • There is a rustic charm to these photographs, taken in off-hours in fort of circus wagons or company busses.
  • Use a smoked salt to add a rustic flavor to otherwise fancy dishes.
  • The roof tiles showed above the supporting beams, and the effect was pleasantly rustic.
British Dictionary definitions for rustic

rustic

/ˈrʌstɪk/
adjective
1.
of, characteristic of, or living in the country; rural
2.
having qualities ascribed to country life or people; simple; unsophisticated rustic pleasures
3.
crude, awkward, or uncouth
4.
made of untrimmed branches a rustic seat
5.
denoting or characteristic of a style of furniture popular in England in the 18th and 19th centuries, in which the legs and feet of chairs, tables, etc, were made to resemble roots, trunks, and branches of trees
6.
(of masonry) having a rusticated finish
noun
7.
a person who comes from or lives in the country
8.
an unsophisticated, simple, or clownish person from the country
9.
Also called rusticwork. brick or stone having a rough finish
Derived Forms
rustically, adverb
rusticity (rʌˈstɪsɪtɪ) noun
Word Origin
C16: from Old French rustique, from Latin rūsticus, from rūs the country
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for rustic
adj.

mid-15c., from Latin rusticus "of the country, rural; country-like, plain, simple, rough, coarse, awkward," from rus (genitive ruris) "open land, country" (see rural). Noun meaning "a country person, peasant" is from 1550s (also in classical Latin). Related: Rustical (early 15c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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