saltcellar

[sawlt-sel-er]
noun
a shaker or dish for salt.

Origin:
1400–50; salt1 + cellar, for earlier saler saltcellar, late Middle English < Old French saliere < Latin salāria, noun use of feminine of salārius (adj.) pertaining to salt, equivalent to sal salt1 + -ārius -ary

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Collins
World English Dictionary
saltcellar (ˈsɔːltˌsɛlə)
 
n
1.  a small container for salt used at the table
2.  informal (Brit) either of the two hollows formed above the collarbones of very slim people
 
[changed (through influence of cellar) from C15 salt saler; saler from Old French saliere container for salt, from Latin salārius belonging to salt, from sal salt]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

saltcellar
1434, from salt + Anglo-Norm. *saler "saltcellar" (14c.), from O.Fr. salier "salt box," from L. salarium, from a dim. of L. sal "salt." As the connection between *saler and "salt" was lost, salt- was tacked on to the beginning; second element altered on model of cellar.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

saltcellar

receptacle for table salt, usually made of metal or glass. Salt was taken from it with small spoons. From the Middle Ages until at least the 16th century, salt was a relatively expensive commodity and was kept at the table in vessels commensurate with this status. A large and elaborate standing saltcellar, frequently made of silver, was the centrepiece of the medieval and Renaissance table. Medieval inventories record fantastic saltcellars incorporating figures of human beings and animals, some late examples of which survive. The most famous saltcellar in the world is of this figural type; it is a gold and enamel piece that was made by Benvenuto Cellini (q.v.) and is the supreme example of goldsmith work in the Renaissance. The earliest existing standard type of saltcellar consists of late 15th-century spool-shaped hourglass salts. These were superseded in the 16th century by pedestal- or drum-shaped saltcellars, such as the Vyvyan Salt (Victoria and Albert Museum, London)

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
And with architecture, you get buildings the same size as a saltcellar.
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