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satisfaction

[sat-is-fak-shuh n] /ˌsæt ɪsˈfæk ʃən/
noun
1.
an act of satisfying; fulfillment; gratification.
2.
the state of being satisfied; contentment.
3.
the cause or means of being satisfied.
4.
confident acceptance of something as satisfactory, dependable, true, etc.
5.
reparation or compensation, as for a wrong or injury.
6.
the opportunity to redress or right a wrong, as by a duel.
7.
payment or discharge, as of a debt or obligation.
8.
Ecclesiastical.
  1. an act of doing penance or making reparation for venial sin.
  2. the penance or reparation made.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; < Latin satisfactiōn- (stem of satisfactiō) a doing enough, equivalent to satisfact(us) (past participle of satisfacere, equivalent to satis enough + facere to make, do1) + -iōn- -ion; replacing Middle English satisfaccioun < Anglo-French < Latin, as above
Related forms
satisfactional, adjective
satisfactionless, adjective
nonsatisfaction, noun
presatisfaction, noun
supersatisfaction, noun
undersatisfaction, noun
Synonyms
2. enjoyment, pleasure, comfort. 5. amends, expiation, atonement, indemnity, indemnification, requital, recompense. 7. repayment, remuneration.
Antonyms
2. displeasure, discontent.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for satisfaction
  • Openness in a government is great for people's confidence and satisfaction with their state.
  • It's not worth giving up your life satisfaction for.
  • Their state of satisfaction is definitely affected by the question of more or less of this thing.
  • Scientists have uncovered evidence for an innate satisfaction in human beings for giving people their comeuppance.
  • The satisfaction, the pleasure, the comfort one takes in these poems comes from the way they seem to have pre-existed us.
  • We must not be found wanting, thereby giving satisfaction to the enemies of freedom everywhere.
  • In theory, life satisfaction might include the various elements of well-being.
  • Midterm feedback from students gives professors a chance to adjust their courses to improve learning and student satisfaction.
  • Moreover, satisfaction for both groups is improving.
  • Those who have received the blessings retire with spiritual satisfaction.
British Dictionary definitions for satisfaction

satisfaction

/ˌsætɪsˈfækʃən/
noun
1.
the act of satisfying or state of being satisfied
2.
the fulfilment of a desire
3.
the pleasure obtained from such fulfilment
4.
a source of fulfilment
5.
reparation or compensation for a wrong done or received
6.
(RC Church, Church of England) the performance by a repentant sinner of a penance
7.
(Christianity) the atonement for sin by the death of Christ
Word Origin
C15: via French from Latin satisfactionem, from satisfacere to satisfy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for satisfaction
n.

early 14c., "performance of an act set forth by a priest or other Church authority to atone for sin," from Old French satisfaction (12c.), from Latin satisfactionem (nominative satisfactio) "a satisfying of a creditor," noun of action from past participle stem of satisfacere (see satisfy). Senses of "contentment, appeasement" and "action of gratifying" first recorded late 14c.; the former not common before 16c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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satisfaction in Medicine

satisfaction sat·is·fac·tion (sāt'ĭs-fāk'shən)
n.

  1. The fulfillment or gratification of a desire, a need, or an appetite.

  2. The pleasure or contentment that is derived from such gratification.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Nearby words for satisfaction