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savor

[sey-ver] /ˈseɪ vər/
noun
1.
the quality in a substance that affects the sense of taste or of smell.
2.
a particular taste or smell.
3.
distinctive quality or property.
4.
power to excite or interest.
5.
Archaic. repute.
verb (used without object)
6.
to have savor, taste, or odor.
7.
to exhibit the peculiar characteristics; smack (often followed by of):
His business practices savor of greed.
verb (used with object)
8.
to give a savor to; season; flavor.
9.
to perceive by taste or smell, especially with relish:
to savor the garden's odors.
10.
to give oneself to the enjoyment of:
to savor the best in life.
Also, especially British, savour.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; (noun) Middle English sav(o)ur < Old French savour < Latin sapōrem, accusative of sapor taste, derivative of sapere to taste (cf. sapient); (v.) Middle English sav(o)uren < Old French savourer < Late Latin sapōrāre, derivative of sapor
Related forms
savorer, noun
savoringly, adverb
savorless, adjective
savorous, adjective
outsavor, verb (used with object)
unsavored, adjective
Can be confused
savior, savor, savory.
Synonyms
1. relish, smack; odor, scent, fragrance. See taste.
Usage note
See -or1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for savor
  • Self-righteousness is a gift that never loses its savor and flavor.
  • Pick your flavor of cynicism and savor it, because supersonic flight won't be back anytime soon.
  • Though you should be out planting, take time to savor the glories of the cherry trees and tulips.
  • Pasties need the right environment for their full savor.
  • savor the flavors of travel with this guide to the world's best trips for foodies and more.
  • He was especially slow about eating a piece of banana he would savor it for the longest time.
  • With an ecosystem under siege, every moment in this wild wonderland is one to savor.
  • Take a deep breath and savor the sweet stench of disappointment.
  • My apologies to those of you who have enough time to read and savor this.
  • These small eggs are normally fried in butter to enhance their delicate savor.
British Dictionary definitions for savor

savour

/ˈseɪvə/
noun
1.
the quality in a substance that is perceived by the sense of taste or smell
2.
a specific taste or smell: the savour of lime
3.
a slight but distinctive quality or trace
4.
the power to excite interest: the savour of wit has been lost
5.
(archaic) reputation
verb
6.
(intransitive) often foll by of. to possess the taste or smell (of)
7.
(intransitive) often foll by of. to have a suggestion (of)
8.
(transitive) to give a taste to; season
9.
(transitive) to taste or smell, esp appreciatively
10.
(transitive) to relish or enjoy
Derived Forms
savourless, (US) savorless, adjective
savorous, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French savour, from Latin sapor taste, from sapere to taste
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for savor
n.

mid-13c., from Old French savor "flavor, taste; sauce, seasoning; delight, pleasure," from Latin saporem (nominative sapor) "taste, flavor," related to sapere "to have a flavor" (see sapient).

v.

c.1300, from Old French savorer "taste, breathe in; appreciate, care for," from Late Latin saporare, from Latin sapor (see savor (n.)). Related: Savored; savoring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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