scabrous

[skab-ruhs]
adjective
1.
having a rough surface because of minute points or projections.
2.
indecent or scandalous; risqué; obscene: scabrous books.
3.
full of difficulties.

Origin:
1575–85; < Latin scab(e)r rough + -ous

scabrously, adverb
scabrousness, noun
unscabrous, adjective
unscabrously, adverb
unscabrousness, noun


2. lewd, wanton, improper.
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World English Dictionary
scabrous (ˈskeɪbrəs)
 
adj
1.  roughened because of small projections; scaly
2.  indelicate, indecent, or salacious: scabrous humour
3.  difficult to deal with; knotty
 
[C17: from Latin scaber rough; related to scabies]
 
'scabrously
 
adv
 
'scabrousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scabrous
1572 (implied in scabrously), from L.L. scabrosus "rough," from L. scaber "rough, scaly," related to scabere "to scratch, scrape" (see scabies). Sense in Eng. evolved from "harsh, unmusical," to "vulgar" (1881), "squalid" (1939) and "nasty, repulsive" (c.1951).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He is, as this rather scabrous blog post puts it, uncheckable.
Here are two brothers, brought up in scabrous surroundings.
Plastic tubes inserted through his nostrils drizzle oxygen into lungs that are little more than scabrous husks.
The spikelets are borne in an open, spreading inflorescence with scabrous branches.
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