scamper

[skam-per]
verb (used without object)
1.
to run or go hastily or quickly.
2.
to run playfully about, as a child.
noun
3.
a scampering; a quick run.

Origin:
1680–90; obsolete scamp to go (see scamp) + -er6

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
scamp2 (skæmp)
 
vb
a less common word for skimp
 
'scamper2
 
n

scamper (ˈskæmpə)
 
vb
1.  to run about playfully
2.  (often foll by through) to hurry quickly through (a place, task, book, etc)
 
n
3.  the act of scampering
 
[C17: probably from scamp (vb); see scamp1]
 
'scamperer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scamper
"to run quickly," 1687, probably from Flem. schampeeren, frequentative of schampen "run away," from O.N.Fr. escamper (O.Fr. eschamper) "to run away, flee," from V.L. *excampare "decamp," lit. "leave the field," from L. ex campo, from ex "out of" + campo, ablative of campus "field" (see
campus). A vogue word late 17c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The implication seems to be that if you drop a lobster in boiling water, it
  will pull itself out and scamper out of the room.
Perhaps the foolish scamper was some sort of friendly signal that he ought to
  have understood.
Next they began to neigh, to curvet, to scamper on all sides over the plain.
Thousands of rats dine with people and scamper over their feet.
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