scintillate

[sin-tl-eyt]
verb (used without object), scintillated, scintillating.
1.
to emit sparks.
2.
to sparkle; flash: a mind that scintillates with brilliance.
3.
to twinkle, as the stars.
4.
Electronics. (of a spot of light or image on a radar display) to shift rapidly around a mean position.
5.
Physics.
a.
(of the amplitude, phase, or polarization of an electromagnetic wave) to fluctuate in a random manner.
b.
(of an energetic photon or particle) to produce a flash of light in a phosphor by striking it.
verb (used with object), scintillated, scintillating.
6.
to emit as sparks; flash forth.

Origin:
1615–25; < Latin scintillātus (past participle of scintillāre to send out sparks, flash). See scintilla, -ate1

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World English Dictionary
scintillate (ˈsɪntɪˌleɪt)
 
vb
1.  (also tr) to give off (sparks); sparkle; twinkle
2.  to be animated or brilliant
3.  physics to give off flashes of light as a result of the impact of particles or photons
 
[C17: from Latin scintillāre, from scintilla a spark]
 
'scintillant
 
adj
 
'scintillantly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

scintillate
1623, from L. scintillatus, pp. of scintillare "to sparkle," from scintilla "spark" (see scintilla).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Liquids which scintillate include toluene and xylene.
Now when they meet one they expect her to scintillate.
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