scornful

[skawrn-fuhl]
adjective
full of scorn; derisive; contemptuous: He smiled in a scornful way.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see scorn, -ful

scornfully, adverb
scornfulness, noun
unscornful, adjective
unscornfully, adverb
unscornfulness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To scornfully
Collins
World English Dictionary
scorn (skɔːn)
 
n
1.  open contempt or disdain for a person or thing; derision
2.  an object of contempt or derision
3.  archaic an act or expression signifying contempt
 
vb
4.  to treat with contempt or derision
5.  (tr) to reject with contempt
 
[C12 schornen, from Old French escharnir, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German scerōn to behave rowdily, obsolete Dutch schern mockery]
 
'scorner
 
n
 
'scornful
 
adj
 
'scornfully
 
adv
 
'scornfulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The genuine antiquary would scornfully call anything modern whose date could be placed this side of the century mark.
To no avail: the top civil servant in the defence ministry scornfully dismissed the court's ruling.
The government scornfully dismissed the criticism: better to provide shelter than ponder it in interminable working groups.
If you are not too friendly with them, they may respond scornfully.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature