scutage

scutage

[skyoo-tij]
noun
(in the feudal system) a payment exacted by a lord in lieu of military service due to him by the holder of a fee.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Medieval Latin scūtāgium. See scutum, -age

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scutage (ˈskjuːtɪdʒ)
 
n
(in feudal society) a payment sometimes exacted by a lord from his vassal in lieu of military service
 
[C15: from Medieval Latin scūtāgium, literally: shield dues, from Latin scūtum a shield]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
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scutage

(scutage from Latin scutum, "shield"), in feudal law, payment made by a knight to commute the military service that he owed his lord. A lord might accept from his vassal a sum of money (or something else of value, often a horse) in lieu of service on some expedition. The system was advantageous to both sides and grew rapidly with the expansion of money economy in Europe in the 12th and 13th centuries.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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