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settee

[set-tee] /sɛtˈti/
noun
1.
a seat for two or more persons, having a back and usually arms, and often upholstered.
Origin of settee
1710-1720
1710-20; perhaps variant of settle2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the web for settee
  • The policeman had been standing on the settee staring out, craning to see who was at the door.
  • The family huddled on a wooden settee and in plastic chairs around a brazier of burning coals on the concrete floor to keep warm.
  • A-Woodworkers know that some woods are better than others for different parts of a chair or settee.
  • Often deeper than a sofa, or slim as a twin bed with or without sides, it's more a generous settee than a one-sided chaise.
  • It consisted of a handsome settee or lounge nicely upholstered and cushioned.
  • Seating types: armchair two seat settee, three seat sofa, and accessory tables.
British Dictionary definitions for settee

settee

/sɛˈtiː/
noun
1.
a seat, for two or more people, with a back and usually with arms
Word Origin
C18: changed from settle²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for settee
n.

"long seat with back and arms," 1716, perhaps a variant of settle (n.), or a diminutive of set (v.) "act of setting."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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6
6
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