shakedown

[sheyk-doun]
noun
1.
extortion, as by blackmail or threats of violence.
2.
a thorough search: a shakedown of prison cells to uncover hidden drugs.
3.
a bed, as of straw or blankets, spread on the floor.
4.
any makeshift bed.
5.
the act or process of shaking down.
6.
Also called shakedown cruise, shakedown flight. a cruise or flight intended to prepare a new vessel or aircraft for regular service by accustoming the crew to its features and peculiarities, breaking in and adjusting machinery, etc.
Also, shake-down.


Origin:
1490–1500; noun, adj. use of verb phrase shake down

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shakedown
1730, "impromptu bed made upon loose straw," from shake + 'down. Fig. verbal sense of "blackmail, extort" is attested from 1872, noun meaning "a thorough search" is from 1914; both probably from the notion of measuring corn. The verbal phrase to shake down "cause to
totter and fall" is recorded from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
My favorite though is the end part which is the inevitable shakedown or threat.
Should a guard confiscate your headphones during a cell shakedown, seek the
  earliest opportunity to throw a cup of urine on him.
It's too soon to say, but for its first shakedown trip, it actually didn't do
  badly.
The video above shows a covert shakedown drive before the car was shown to the
  public.
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