Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Fall Head Over Heels...

sheaves1

[sheevz] /ʃivz/
noun
1.
plural of sheaf.

sheaves2

[shivz, sheevz] /ʃɪvz, ʃivz/
noun
1.
plural of sheave2 .

sheaf

[sheef] /ʃif/
noun, plural sheaves.
1.
one of the bundles in which cereal plants, as wheat, rye, etc., are bound after reaping.
2.
any bundle, cluster, or collection:
a sheaf of papers.
verb (used with object)
3.
to bind (something) into a sheaf or sheaves.
Origin of sheaf
900
before 900; Middle English shefe (noun), Old English schēaf; cognate with Dutch schoof sheaf, German Schaub wisp of straw, Old Norse skauf tail of a fox
Related forms
sheaflike, adjective

sheave1

[sheev] /ʃiv/
verb (used with object), sheaved, sheaving.
1.
to gather, collect, or bind into a sheaf or sheaves.
Origin
1570-80; derivative of sheaf

sheave2

[shiv, sheev] /ʃɪv, ʃiv/
noun
1.
a pulley for hoisting or hauling, having a grooved rim for retaining a wire rope.
2.
a wheel with a grooved rim, for transmitting force to a cable or belt.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English schive; akin to Dutch schijf sheave, German Scheibe disk
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for sheaves
Historical Examples
  • I mow and she binds the sheaves, and sometimes we both of us reap.

    Resurrection Leo Tolstoy
  • Their weeping seed-sowing was followed by rejoicing, bringing their sheaves with them.

    The Story of My Life Egerton Ryerson
  • Long-tackle blocks have two sheaves of different sizes placed one above the other, as in fiddle-blocks.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • A long-tackle or fiddle-block has two sheaves—one below the other, like a fiddle.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • And now she had come back with her sheaves and had been met on the threshold by Beryl with her hideous confidences.

    December Love Robert Hichens
  • A West Indian tree, of the wood of which sheaves of blocks are made.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • He closed it sharply, as if annoyed, called to one of the men gathering up the sheaves, and then walked toward the house.

    Prescott of Saskatchewan Harold Bindloss
  • As on the field the reapers sing, while binding up the sheaves!

  • That she said as she laughed and sobbed, crying out wildly, “Bringing your sheaves with you, your sheaves with you.”

    Books and Bookmen Ian Maclaren
  • The oats shall be cut—I'll hire someone, and to bind the sheaves too.

British Dictionary definitions for sheaves

sheaves

/ʃiːvz/
noun
1.
the plural of sheaf

sheaf

/ʃiːf/
noun (pl) sheaves (ʃiːvz)
1.
a bundle of reaped but unthreshed corn tied with one or two bonds
2.
a bundle of objects tied together
3.
the arrows contained in a quiver
verb
4.
(transitive) to bind or tie into a sheaf
Word Origin
Old English sceaf, related to Old High German skoub sheaf, Old Norse skauf tail, Gothic skuft tuft of hair

sheave1

/ʃiːv/
verb
1.
(transitive) to gather or bind into sheaves

sheave2

/ʃiːv/
noun
1.
a wheel with a grooved rim, esp one used as a pulley
Word Origin
C14: of Germanic origin; compare Old High German scība disc
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for sheaves

sheaf

n.

Old English sceaf (plural sceafas) "large bundle of corn," from Proto-Germanic *skauf- (cf. Old Saxon scof, Middle Dutch scoof, Dutch schoof, Old High German scoub "sheaf, bundle," German Schaub "sheaf;" Old Norse skauf "fox's tail;" Gothic skuft "hair on the head," German Schopf "tuft"), from PIE root *(s)keup- "cluster, tuft, hair of the head." Extended to bundles of things other than grain by c.1300. Also used in Middle English for "two dozen arrows." General sense of "a collection" is from 1728.

sheave

v.

"to gather up in sheaves," 1570s; see sheaf. Related: Sheaved; sheaving. Earlier verb in this sense was simply sheaf (c.1500).

n.

"grooved wheel to receive a cord, pulley" (mid-14c.), also "slice of bread" (late 14c.), related to shive (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for sheaves

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for sheaves

13
13
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for sheaves