shredding

[shred-ing]
noun
furring attached to the undersides of rafters.
Also, shreading.


Origin:
1660–70; origin uncertain

nonshredding, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

shred

[shred]
noun
1.
a piece cut or torn off, especially in a narrow strip.
2.
a bit; scrap: We haven't got a shred of evidence.
verb (used with object), shredded or shred, shredding.
3.
to cut or tear into small pieces, especially small strips; reduce to shreds.
verb (used without object), shredded or shred, shredding.
4.
to be cut up, torn, etc.: The blouse had shredded.

Origin:
before 1000; (noun) Middle English schrede, Old English scrēade; cognate with Old Norse skrjōthr worn-out book, German Schrot chips; (v.) Middle English schreden, Old English scrēadian to pare, trim; akin to shroud; cf. screed

shredless, adjective
shredlike, adjective
unshredded, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
shred (ʃrɛd)
 
n
1.  a long narrow strip or fragment torn or cut off
2.  a very small piece or amount; scrap
 
vb , shreds, shredding, shredded, shred
3.  (tr) to tear or cut into shreds
 
[Old English scread; related to Old Norse skrjōthr torn-up book, Old High German scrōt cut-off piece; see scroll, shroud, screed]
 
'shredder
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shred
O.E. screade "piece cut off," from W.Gmc. *skraudas (cf. M.L.G. schrot "piece cut off," O.H.G. scrot, "a cutting, piece cut off," Ger. Schrot "small shot," O.N. skrydda "shriveled skin"), from PIE base *skreu- "to cut, cutting tool" (cf. L. scrutari "to search, examine," from scruta "trash, frippery;"
O.E. scrud "dress, garment;" see shroud). The verb is from O.E. screadian "prune, cut" (cf. M.Du. scroden, Du. schroeien, O.H.G. scrotan, Ger. schroten "to shred"). Shredded wheat is recorded fron 1899; shredder in the paper disposal sense is from 1950.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Smelting has a further disadvantage in that shredding the boards to recover the
  metals destroys their components.
Shredding compost materials before adding them to the pile helps them decompose
  quickly.
The adhesion keeps them from washing into the spleen, which cleans the blood by
  shredding damaged cells.
Grate zucchini using medium shredding disk of a food processor.
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