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shuttle

[shuht-l] /ˈʃʌt l/
noun
1.
a device in a loom for passing or shooting the weft thread through the shed from one side of the web to the other, usually consisting of a boat-shaped piece of wood containing a bobbin on which the weft thread is wound.
2.
the sliding container that carries the lower thread in a sewing machine.
3.
a public conveyance, as a train, airplane, or bus, that travels back and forth at regular intervals over a particular route, especially a short route or one connecting two transportation systems.
4.
shuttlecock (def 1).
5.
(often initial capital letter) space shuttle.
verb (used with object), shuttled, shuttling.
6.
to cause (someone or something) to move to and fro or back and forth by or as if by a shuttle:
They shuttled me all over the seventh floor.
verb (used without object), shuttled, shuttling.
7.
to move to and fro:
constantly shuttling between city and suburb.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English shotil (noun), Old English scytel dart, arrow; cognate with Old Norse skutill harpoon; akin to shut, shoot
Related forms
shuttlelike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for shuttle
  • Everyone who has met you, including meal companions and shuttle drivers, will be asked to provide feedback to the committee.
  • After school, parents shuttle their kids from activity to activity, depriving them of unstructured time alone or with friends.
  • And expanding the grid is a huge, costly gamble to shuttle intermittent power around.
  • But the stay has been extended because of problems launching another shuttle.
  • Workers routinely shuttle between industries and cities to wherever jobs are abundant.
  • Many of them shuttle between the public and private sectors.
  • Professional parents shuttle their kids from choir practice to baseball camp and check that they are doing their homework.
  • These scanners are usually used to inspect the space shuttle's solid fuel rockets.
  • The bacteria were acquiring mutations that allowed them to shuttle the antibiotic out of the cell.
  • If you see the space shuttle crashing, you can see that these guys in the white coats don't always get it right.
British Dictionary definitions for shuttle

shuttle

/ˈʃʌtəl/
noun
1.
a bobbin-like device used in weaving for passing the weft thread between the warp threads
2.
a small bobbin-like device used to hold the thread in a sewing machine or in tatting, knitting, etc
3.
  1. a bus, train, aircraft, etc, that plies between two points, esp one that offers a frequent service over a short route
  2. short for space shuttle
4.
  1. the movement between various countries of a diplomat in order to negotiate with rulers who refuse to meet each other
  2. (as modifier): shuttle diplomacy
5.
(badminton) short for shuttlecock
verb
6.
to move or cause to move by or as if by a shuttle
Word Origin
Old English scytel bolt; related to Middle High German schüzzel, Swedish skyttel. See shoot, shot
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for shuttle
n.

Old English scytel "a dart, arrow," from West Germanic *skutilaz (cf. Old Norse skutill "harpoon"), from PIE *skeud- "to shoot, to chase, to throw, to project" (see shoot (v.)). The original sense in English is obsolete; the weaving instrument so called (mid-14c.) from being "shot" across the threads. Sense of "train that runs back and forth" is first recorded 1895, from image of the weaver's instrument's back-and-forth movement over the warp; extended to aircraft 1942, to spacecraft 1969. In some other languages, the weaving instrument takes its name from its resemblance to a boat (cf. Latin navicula, French navette, German weberschiff).

v.

1550s, "move rapidly to and fro," from shuttle (n.); sense of "transport via a shuttle service" is recorded from 1930. Related: Shuttled; shuttling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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