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Sid

[sid] /sɪd/
noun
1.
a male or female given name, form of Sidney or Sydney.

Caesar

[see-zer] /ˈsi zər/
noun
1.
Gaius
[gey-uh s] /ˈgeɪ əs/ (Show IPA),
(or Caius)
[key-uh s] /ˈkeɪ əs/ (Show IPA),
Julius, c100–44 b.c, Roman general, statesman, and historian.
2.
Sidney ("Sid") 1922–2014, U.S. comedian.
3.
a title of the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian, and later of the heirs presumptive.
4.
any emperor.
5.
a tyrant or dictator.
6.
any temporal ruler, in contrast with God; the civil authority. Matt. 22:21.
7.
a male given name: from a Roman family name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for Sid
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • AT half-past nine, that night, Tom and Sid were sent to bed, as usual.

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Complete Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
  • Sid had just copied and in his usual style laid it on thick.

    No Great Magic Fritz Reuter Leiber
  • For a mile or more Sid saw nothing on which to focus his camera.

    A Quarter-Back's Pluck Lester Chadwick
  • But when Sid gets an inspiration he can be very bull-headed.

    No Great Magic Fritz Reuter Leiber
  • They went to dinner feeling rather more encouraged and found that Sid had returned with good tidings.

    The Crimson Sweater Ralph Henry Barbour
British Dictionary definitions for Sid

Caesar

/ˈsiːzə/
noun
1.
Gaius Julius (ˈɡaɪəs ˈdʒuːlɪəs). 100–44 bc, Roman general, statesman, and historian. He formed the first triumvirate with Pompey and Crassus (60), conquered Gaul (58–50), invaded Britain (55–54), mastered Italy (49), and defeated Pompey (46). As dictator of the Roman Empire (49–44) he destroyed the power of the corrupt Roman nobility. He also introduced the Julian calendar and planned further reforms, but fear of his sovereign power led to his assassination (44) by conspirators led by Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longinus
2.
any Roman emperor
3.
(sometimes not capital) any emperor, autocrat, dictator, or other powerful ruler
4.
a title of the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian
5.
(in the Roman Empire)
  1. a title borne by the imperial heir from the reign of Hadrian
  2. the heir, deputy, and subordinate ruler to either of the two emperors under Diocletian's system of government
6.
short for Caesar salad
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Sid

Caesar

c.1200, see caesarian; Old English had casere, which would have yielded modern *coser, but it was replaced in Middle English by keiser, from Norse or Low German, and later in Middle English by the French or Latin form of the name. Cæsar was used as a title of emperors down to Hadrian (138 C.E.), and also is the root of German Kaiser and Russian tsar (see czar). He competes as progenitor of words for "king" with Charlemagne (Latin Carolus), as in Lithuanian karalius, Polish krol. In U.S. slang c.1900, a sheriff was Great Seizer.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Sid in Culture

Caesar definition


The family name of Julius Caesar and of the next eleven rulers of Rome, who were emperors.

Note: The emperors of Germany and Russia in modern times adapted the word caesar into titles for themselves — kaiser and czar.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Related Abbreviations for Sid

SID

1.
state inpatient database
2.
sudden ionospheric disturbance
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Sid in the Bible

the title assumed by the Roman emperors after Julius Caesar. In the New Testament this title is given to various emperors as sovereigns of Judaea without their accompanying distinctive proper names (John 19:15; Acts 17:7). The Jews paid tribute to Caesar (Matt. 22:17), and all Roman citizens had the right of appeal to him (Acts 25:11). The Caesars referred to in the New Testament are Augustus (Luke 2:1), Tiberius (3:1; 20:22), Claudius (Acts 11:28), and Nero (Acts 25:8; Phil. 4:22).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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